Seminars, workshops, and recreational opportunities designed especially for GSAS students, to help you build professional skills and make the most of the winter break.
 

Topics:
Student Run Mini-Courses
Professional Development
Arts, Culture, and Recreation

TitleStartEnd
January 6
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
January 7
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
January 8
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
January 9
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
January 12
The European Union fundamental rights system and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American perspective. 8:00 am12:00 pm
The OECD Standard of Information Exchange. Was is really spurred by FATCA? 9:00 am11:00 am
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Climate Data: How Do We Know What We Know About Climate Change? 10:00 am12:00 pm
Writing and Publishing for a General Audience 10:00 am11:30 am
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
HipHop Dance Workshop for Beginners 6:00 pm7:30 pm
January 13
A Pocket Guide to Mental Health 12:00 am12:00 am
The European Union fundamental rights system and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American perspective. 8:00 am12:00 pm
Memory, Trauma and War: Depicting "Japan" in East Asian Cinema 9:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Climate Data: How Do We Know What We Know About Climate Change? 10:00 am12:00 pm
Introduction to Analytical Bibliography 10:00 am12:00 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 1:00 pm7:00 pm
January 14
The European Union fundamental rights system and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American perspective. 8:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:00 pm
Zotero for Historical / Archival Research 10:00 am12:00 pm
Climate Data: How Do We Know What We Know About Climate Change? 10:00 am12:00 pm
Writing and Publishing for a General Audience 10:00 am11:30 am
Compound Interest and other Forces: a Straight Sprint down Wall Street 11:00 am12:30 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Shakespeare and His First Folio in Context 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
What is the Social in "Social Media"? 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
January 15
A Pocket Guide to Mental Health 12:00 am12:00 am
The European Union fundamental rights system and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American perspective. 8:00 am12:00 pm
Memory, Trauma and War: Depicting "Japan" in East Asian Cinema 9:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Climate Data: How Do We Know What We Know About Climate Change? 10:00 am12:00 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Printing Workshop 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Introduction to the Harry Elkins Widener Collection 2:00 pm4:00 pm
What is the Social in "Social Media"? 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Take Control of Your Career 3:30 pm5:30 pm
HipHop Dance Workshop for Beginners 6:00 pm7:30 pm
January 16
The European Union fundamental rights system and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American perspective. 8:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Writing and Publishing for a General Audience 10:00 am11:30 am
Climate Data: How Do We Know What We Know About Climate Change? 10:00 am12:00 pm
Compound Interest and other Forces: a Straight Sprint down Wall Street 11:00 am12:30 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Dudley Classic Films Presents LAWRENCE OF ARABIA 5:30 pm12:00 am
January 19
Get Your Game On: Game of Thrones Event Design Workshop 9:30 am3:30 pm
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Compound Interest and other Forces: a Straight Sprint down Wall Street 11:00 am12:30 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
HipHop Dance Workshop for Beginners 6:00 pm7:30 pm
January 20
A Pocket Guide to Mental Health 12:00 am12:00 am
How to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Pedagogical Graphics & Animation Workshop 9:00 am12:00 pm
Memory, Trauma and War: Depicting "Japan" in East Asian Cinema 9:00 am12:00 pm
City Metrics: A Path to Understanding Urban Structures and Processes 9:00 am12:00 pm
Get Your Game On: Game of Thrones Event Design Workshop 9:30 am3:30 pm
Crimson Toastmasters: Build Your Public Speaking Skills 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Communicating your Research: Essentials for PhD Students 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Boot Camp on Writing Fellowship Proposals in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Microscopy Workshop 3:30 pm8:00 pm
January 21
A Pocket Guide to Mental Health 12:00 am12:00 am
How to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Pedagogical Graphics & Animation Workshop 9:00 am12:00 pm
Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am8:00 pm
Get Your Game On: Game of Thrones Event Design Workshop 9:30 am3:30 pm
Personal Finance Management 9:30 am1:30 pm
Implementing the 7 Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education: Using Technology as a Lever 10:00 am12:00 pm
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:00 pm
Writing and Publishing for a General Audience 10:00 am11:30 am
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Asking the Right Questions: Making Use of Student Feedback 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Make Your Own Book 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 2:00 pm7:00 pm
What is the Social in "Social Media"? 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
January 22
A Pocket Guide to Mental Health 12:00 am12:00 am
How to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am9:00 pm
Fundamentals of Teaching Sections in STEM Courses 9:00 am12:30 pm
Fundamentals of Teaching in Humanities and Social Sciences 9:00 am12:30 pm
Pedagogical Graphics & Animation Workshop 9:00 am12:00 pm
Memory, Trauma and War: Depicting "Japan" in East Asian Cinema 9:00 am12:00 pm
Personal Finance Management 9:30 am1:30 pm
Get Your Game On: Game of Thrones Event Design Workshop 9:30 am3:30 pm
Science and Shaping Public Policy 10:00 am11:30 am
Death is Beautiful: Treatments of the Dead in Global History 1:00 pm4:00 pm
What is the Social in "Social Media"? 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Communicating Across Borders and Boundaries: A Workshop for ITFs 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 2:00 pm7:00 pm
The Pedagogy of Discovery: Best Practices for Student Engagement with Primary and Secondary Materials 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Win Over the Employer! How to Interview Intelligently 4:00 pm5:00 pm
HipHop Dance Workshop for Beginners 6:00 pm7:30 pm
January 23
Fourth Annual Future of Computation Symposium: Privacy in a Networked World 12:00 am12:00 am
How to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Strategy Consulting 9:00 am12:00 pm
Readings in Greek and Roman Dance: from Plato to Macrobius 9:00 am11:00 am
Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am8:00 pm
Personal Finance Management 9:30 am1:30 pm
Get Your Game On: Game of Thrones Event Design Workshop 9:30 am3:30 pm
Your Future as a Teacher-Scholar: Creating a Teaching Portfolio 10:00 am12:00 pm
The West African Universes and Multi-culturalism through the Voice of a Female Writer 10:00 am11:30 am
Writing and Publishing for a General Audience 10:00 am11:30 am
Medieval Art, Harvard, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela 11:00 am12:00 pm
Medieval Art, Harvard, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela 12:00 pm1:30 pm
Teaching in General Education 12:00 pm1:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Finance 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Insect Sex: What the Most Diverse Group of Animals Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Sex 1:00 pm2:00 pm
Developing a Professional Role as a Teacher: Professional Conduct 1:15 pm2:15 pm
Catching Nature in the Act: Cinematic Experiments in Multispecies Thinking 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Advanced course on European Union Law and Government 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 4:30 pm5:30 pm
Beating the System: Identity Dynamics in Academics and Equal Access to the Profession 4:30 pm7:00 pm
Medieval Art, Harvard, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela 10:00 pm11:00 am
January 24
Business Applications Workshop: Recent Graduates 9:00 am12:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Starting Your Own Business 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Step into Art exhibit and reception 2:00 pm4:00 pm
January 26
Job Search: Tough Questions and Negotiations 1:00 pm2:30 pm
Nonverbal Communication: How it Affects Your Job Search 4:00 pm5:00 pm
January 28
Career Jump Start 10:00 am1:00 pm
January 30
I'm Graduating, Now What? Non-academic Job Search for Graduate Students 10:00 am11:30 am
February 4
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:30 pm
Student Run Mini-Courses

In the context of the current debate about public service design and delivery regimes, in this course we are going to review the institutional and organizational capabilities required to properly manage and increase the chances of success of a public-private partnership.

This course will provide with elementary and advanced information about the EU fundamental rights system and how it works and interacts within the Member States in contrast with the US judicial review and the State judges and Supreme Court decision on fundamental rights and interpretations of the fundamental law.

This course will help to strengthen an advanced study and analysis of the European Union constitutional law and government. The students will debate and discuss about fundamental documents of the EU, legal texts and doctrinal publications. This course also gives a comparative vision of the US and EU decision-making processes.

Taking into account that collaborative governance is becoming a primary motif in public administration, this course is focused on training people interested to lead intergovernmental collaboration processes, public-private partnerships and policy networks. We will put in practice the competences needed to properly initiate, implement and assess collaborative governance initiatives.

Examine the intersection of science, anthropology, and Game of Thrones literature and television during an intensive week of creative museum event planning.  Work together to plan, promote, and run a Game of Thrones Museum Night for fellow students inside the Harvard Museum of Natural History and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

We all got the “birds and bees” talk at some point in our youth, but it probably did not give enough attention to the love lives of actual bees. We will cover the incredibly diverse, usually fascinating and occasionally horrifying sex lives of insects, from locating a member of the opposite sex, courtship, coitus and fertilization, all the way to egg laying or live birth, and parental care for the offspring that result. Along the way, we will talk about why these many different behaviors are adaptive, and we will discuss theories about how they evolved in the first place. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

In this course we will explore the limits of human cognition and attention, and see how magicians use these to fool us into thinking that they can bend spoons with the power of their minds or that a chosen card can travel through a deck to reveal itself.  We will look at how magicians imitate nature by looking at how appearing silks and flashes of fire are based on the same principles that stick insects or antelope use to avoid predators.  We will discuss how con artists and fortune tellers use our social adaptations and innate predispositions against us. And we will talk about how superstitions and preconceived notions work to make us more susceptible to being conned or deceived and discuss ways of avoiding becoming and easy mark. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

This course uses experimental cinema to interrogate relationships between humans and other animals. Some of films are documentary or ethnography, others reappropriate science footage, and yet others are explorations of science fiction. We use these works to grapple with questions of representation, exploitation, and narration across the species boundaries. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

Across time and space, death is a near universal construct in human lives: human groups recognize death as a significant landmark in sociocultural conceptions of life. This course, grounded in anthropological theory and methods, provides an interdisciplinary approach to human interactions with death. This course will introduce participants to contemporary and historical interpretations of death, demonstrating themes surrounding these interactions, as well as key cultural differences. This course will investigate fundamental questions about human interactions with death, and demonstrate how historical, material, and anthropological records of death can explicate complicated perspectives, fears, and anxieties connected to human life? This course is open to anyone interested but pre-registration is highly encouraged. Enroll here.

The goal of the course is to provide an introduction into the data, facts, and tools used to assess global climatic change. We seek to answer the question "How do we know that the earth's climate has been changing?" We will discuss how climatic records from both recent and distant history are obtained and what they tell us human contribution to earth's constantly changing climate. Finally, we will briefly touch upon how future climate change predictions are made. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

This course intends to introduce those outside the field of Gender and Women's studies to the ways in which gender and society interact. We will limit our scope to only graduate student life. The course will include discussions about the topic of unconscious bias and tie its impact to teaching in the classroom, relationships with other graduate students and advisers, and going on the job market after graduation. Due to the sensitive nature of course material, this course is restricted to those who sign up. Enroll here.

Mental health is a topic often considered to be too taboo for everyday discussion. As a result, mysteries and rumor abound about what goes on behind the closed doors of therapy. This course will provide an insider's perspective on the field of mental health with an emphasis on what is supported by science and research. Participants will learn how and why diagnoses are made, the differences between therapy providers, the differences between types of therapy interventions for specific diagnostic categories, and actual strategies for managing troublesome emotions. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

Are computers social? Do algorithms care about the social? This course will introduce students to critical conversations and essential texts on social media. Addressing topics such as networking/friending, liking/unliking/sharing, data mining, and  political mobilization, this course combines academic and popular approaches to social media. The class is open to everyone but pre-registration is highly recommended. Enroll here.

You know those pop science articles that make every incremental advance sound like the splitting of the atom? Ever wonder how those get published? Or why yesterday’s Middle East expert is today’s infectious diseases guru? Think you can do better? This mini-course covers writing, selling, and publishing for popular outlets. We’ll devote sessions to pitches, commentaries and op-eds, query letters to agents, and book proposals for trade presses. If there is interest, we can carve out time to workshop pitches and send them out into the world. This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

We have all seen Hollywood movies about the Japanese in World War II. But how is the war and its traumas remembered in Japan, or China, or South Korea? How do each of these countries' film industries balance condemnation of war aggression with remembrance of suffering, all while juggling capitalist realities (such as not wanting to offend the potentially lucrative markets of film-goers in neighboring countries)?  Come to this course to find out, as we screen and discuss four examples of East Asian films struggling to define 'Japan' and trying to remember the war! This class is open to everyone. Enroll here.

Graduate education in the sciences has historically been focused on training students to become capable scientists, with the implicit expectation that a majority would eventually pursue research careers. In recent years, however, it has become clear that scientists are becoming a valuable resource outside of academia. The scientists of today must not only be capable of producing research, but also be prepared to engage with the world at large, such as through shaping public policy. This class is designed as a concise and applied introduction to science policy. We will hear from Broad Institute’s Bina Venkataraman who will draw from her experience as Senior Advisor for Climate Change Innovation in the Executive Office of the President, and Randy Salzman, journalist and communications professor specializing in policy issues. An op-ed writing workshop on pressing scientific and technologic issues will close this two-week class. See the course syllabus here and enroll here.

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Professional Development

"City Metrics" will describe the value of urban performance indicators in the understanding of city morphologies and dynamics. It will introduce students to multiple metrics approaches and goals, and will examine through some case studies how these indexes inform design and policy-making decisions.

Are you a PhD student graduating in May? Have you just realized you need a job in a few months? Don't panic! OCS is here to help you whip your nonacademic job search into shape. Check out this workshop to learn about valuable resources and strategies to begin an effective non-academic job search. We will cover topics such as the importance of networking, how alumni can help in your search, skills you have the employers may be looking for, crafting an effective resume, and more! Please register through Crimson Careers.

Have you received an invitation to interview for an academic or nonacademic job? What question do you dread most?  Do you have an important personal issue that impacts on your decision to accept a job offer, such as the "two-body problem," work visa issues, family considerations, need for a workplace accepting of your sexual orientation, religion, or other concern?  Attend this discussion led by all three of the GSAS career counselors and bring your toughest questions!

You have an interview. Now what? This workshop will discuss the different types of interviews, what hiring managers look for and tips on how to answer tough questions. Please register through Crimson Careers.

Sometimes, climbing the academic ladder feels like you're climbing into the clouds. You know whatss up there, but you can't really see it. Do you KNOW you want to keep climbing this ladder? What are your other options? How can you even get started? Come learn how to take on some of these big career questions. In this workshop, engage in interactive career self-assessment exercises to better understand your skills, interests, and values. Then, we will discuss a variety of careers of interest to biomedical science PhDs along with ways to explore them. Leave with a plan discover, explore, and pursue career options based on your unique self-assessment... maybe even your dream job! Please register through Crimson Careers.

In this four-session series for PhD students, you will consider whether a nonacademic career is right for you and learn the skills needed to begin the transition through in-depth self-assessment, brainstorming, and exploring career options. Space is limited and registration is required for this workshop series. Please make every effort to commit to all four meetings. Eligibility: PhD students and alumni from all GSAS departments. Registration: Please email Laura Stark, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., with your G-level (or year of graduation) and department.

Is your paper potentially a publishable article? Find out in this series of January@GSAS workshops. The workshops offer GSAS students the opportunity to engage collectively and individually in the process of preparing papers for submission to journals. Within one of three groups of four people each (devoted respectively to the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural and Applied Sciences), you will engage in collective critique, receive individual feedback, make initial revisions to your paper, and learn about the process of submitting your papers to journals. You will emerge from these workshops with a paper that is on its way to being ready to submit to a journal or simply with an enhanced awareness of what steps to take when you are ready to embark on the road toward publication.  The workshop is open to currently enrolled GSAS students, as well as to special students and visiting fellows who are registered with GSAS. Please submit a paper suitable for conversion into a journal article (keeping in mind that standard lengths of articles vary according to discipline) with an essay of two to three paragraphs identifying your department and G-year, detailing your research objectives, and explaining what you hope to contribute to and learn from the workshop. The paper you submit will be read and discussed by workshop participants. Participation is limited to four students in each workshop group. Application deadline is January 9. Please contact Suzanne Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with questions.

Students who attend the boot camp receive feedback on their own proposal writing and also offer the same to their fellow students. It is intended for students in the humanities and social sciences. Participants are asked in advance to bring a draft of their opening paragraph or two of a fellowship proposal as the basis for discussion (with sufficient copies for all the participants).  

The topics and fields in the session for the humanities and social sciences are likely to cover a vast terrain -- geographically, chronologically, and methodologically.  By confining the discussion to opening paragraphs we will be able to achieve considerable focus. An even more compelling reason for focusing on the openings is the simple wisdom that getting a proposal off to a good strong start is beneficial for what happens next – also applicable for the opening of a seminar paper, or a dissertation chapter.

As ambitious as all this sounds, our goals are in fact modest. We hope that people will leave the session fired up to further refine their drafts, recognizing that writing a potentially winning fellowship proposal is no small or easy task.

Please read this excerpt from Scholarly Pursuits prior to attending the workshop. Pre-registration is required by emailing Cynthia Verba (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Using the new HOLLIS+ catalog: tips, tricks and in-depth searching. In this workshop we'll teach you the secrets the librarians are using to perform advanced searches, find specialty items, and generally get the most out of of the most advanced catalog the Harvard Library has ever had!

Students explore case studies from financial markets, applying scientific/mathematical training to identify and solve problems. Useful for students interested to see how a little math goes far in the real world or seeking jobs in finance. Prerequisites: First year undergraduate calculus/probability. Useful: Spreadsheets - but Excel skills will be developed.

This workshop is a crash-course on Zotero, a powerful, free, and easy-to-use tool for collecting, organizing, and citing your research. In addition to Zotero basics, we will delve into the most effective uses of Zotero for historical / archival research such as managing research images and using Zotero as a research log.

The program is designed for Harvard graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty who want to learn spatial analysis and apply GIS methods in their research. No previous GIS training required, but you must have familiarity with MS Office and Internet usage. More info here

You might not think that things like hairstyle, tone of voice, facial expressions or posture would affect your networking, interviewing, and negotiating processes, but in fact you would be incorrect! Come learn ways to effectively communicate non-verbally so that you can leave a positive lasting impression with all those that you meet. Please register through Crimson Careers.

IACS has partnered with several organizations to offer an exciting series of workshops during the week of January 12-16, 2015. Presented by Continuum Analytics (Python), Julia, Mathworks, NVIDIA, IQSS, Vowpal Wabbit and Amazon AWS, the workshops will feature instruction in software tools for modeling, analysis, scientific computing and visualization, as well as how to use cluster, grid and cloud resources with support of Academic Computing.

The Student Computational Challenge, open to undergraduates and G1 and G2 graduate students, is an exciting test of computational knowledge and skill. Teams of 2-3 students will have two days to develop, test, and program an algorithmic strategy to win a computational game. The challenge will kick off on January 20, and the final tournament rounds will be held on the afternoon of January 22.

On Friday, January 23, IACS will host the fourth annual future of computation symposium.  This year's talk is titled "Privacy in a Networked World." 

Confirmed Speakers:

  • Bruce Schneier, fellow at Harvard's Berkman Center on Internet and Society, in live video conversation with Edward Snowden, former system administrator for the NSA
  • Cynthia Dwork, Senior Scientist, Microsoft Research
  • Lee Rainie, Director of Internet, Science and Technology Research, Pew Research Center
  • John Wilbanks, Chief Commons Officer, Sage Bionetworks

Available to Harvard faculty, students and staff, and external community members as space permits.

Participants will be given hands-on training to visualize microbes using various microscopy techniques, including light, fluorescence, confocal, electron (TEM and SEM) and atomic force microscopy. The workshop will also provide an opportunity to interact with MSI faculty and fellow members of the graduate consortium, both scientifically and socially. The workshop schedule can be found here. To sign-up, please email Karen Lachmayr at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Get inside information from GSAS alumni and business leaders about how your PhD can be valuable in nonacademic settings. In this session, you’ll hear from seasoned alumni about their own tracks in the world of Strategy Consulting. Location: Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South. Class size is limited; advanced registration is required.

 

9-9:15am: Welcome: Karen J. Hladik, Ph.D., GSAS Alumni Association Council

Mia de Kuijper, Ph.D., GSAS Alumni Association Council

 

9:15-10:00am: “Strategy in a Connected World”

Mia de Kuijper, Ph.D., CEO of Cambridge Partners, former Senior Managing Director on Wall Street and Chief Strategist at Pepsi-Cola Int’l

 

10:00-10:30am: “Why Consulting is an Exciting Career”

Sandra Moose, Ph.D., Senior Advisor to BCG and former Senior Vice President of BCG

 

10:30-10:45am: Break

 

10:45-11:15am: “Making Strategy Actionable”

Alan Kantrow, Ph.D., Chief Learning and Communications Officer at The Governance Lab @NYU and former Senior Partner and Chief Knowledge Officer at Monitor Group

 

11:15am-12noon: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Strategy Consulting

Mia de Kuijper, Sandra Moose, Alan Kantrow,  and Heather Law (OCS)

Get inside information from GSAS alumni and business leaders about how your PhD can be valuable in nonacademic settings. In this session, you’ll hear from seasoned alumni about their own tracks in the world of Finance. Location: Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South. Class size is limited; advanced registration is required.

 

1-1:15pm: Welcome: Karen J. Hladik, Ph.D., GSAS Alumni Association Council

 

1:15-1:30pm: “From Academia to Finance: Transitionable Skills for the Ph.D.”

Karen J. Hladik, Ph.D., Quantitative Specialist and former Global Head of Risk & Quantitative Services for GSS at Goldman Sachs & Co.

 

1:30-2:00pm: “Corporate Deal-Making and Alternative Investments (M&A, Private Equity, Hedge Funds)”

Stacy Dick, Ph.D., Chief Financial Officer, Tiger Management Advisors LLC/Julian Robertson Holdings

 

2:00-2:30pm: “Portfolio Management and Socially Responsible Investing”

Lisette Cooper, Ph.D., Founder, CEO, and Managing Director of Athena Capital Advisors

 

2:30-2:45pm: Break

 

2:45-3:30pm:“Investment Banking and Private Banking”

Kenneth Froewiss, Ph.D., Chair of the Deutsche Funds and former Managing Director in the Financial Institutions Group at J.P. Morgan

 

3:30-4pm: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Finance

Karen Hladik, Stacy Dick, Lisette Cooper, Kenneth Froewiss, and Heather Law (OCS)

Get inside information from GSAS alumni and business leaders about how your PhD can be valuable in nonacademic settings. In this session, you’ll hear from recent graduates who’ve found success on the non-academic job market as they discuss the transition from student to working professional. Location: Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall. Class size is limited; advanced registration is required.

 

9-9:15am: Welcome: Garth McCavana, Ph.D., GSAS Dean for Student Affairs

 

9:15-9:45am: “Teaching Global Health: We Want You!”

Cherie Ramirez, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Global Learning Studio, Global Health Education and Learning Incubator at Harvard University

 

9:45-10:00am: “Biotech Company Building and Consulting”

Carlos Loya, Ph.D., Engagement Manager at Campbell Alliance, specializing in the biotechnology industry

 

10:00-10:15am: “A Variety of Opportunities at Educational Institutions”

Cammi Valdez, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Undergraduate Research, Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships, Harvard College

 

10:15-10:30am: Break

 

10:30-10:45am: “Reflections on Becoming an Archivist/Librarian: What It Is, What It Isn’t, and What Led Me Here”

Sofia Becerra-Licha,AM, Archivist, Stan Getz Library, Berklee College of Music

 

10:45-11:00am: “The Challenges in Large Scale Disease Research”

Mauricio Carneiro, Ph.D., Group Lead, Computational Technology Development, Broad Institute

 

10:45am-12noon: Panel and Q&A on Recent Graduates Workshop

Cherie Ramirez, Carlos Loya, Cammi Valdez, Sofia Becerra-Licha, Mauricio Carneiro, and Laura Stark (OCS)

Get inside information from GSAS alumni and business leaders about how your PhD can be valuable in nonacademic settings. In this session, you’ll hear from seasoned alumni about their own tracks in the world of Strategy Consulting. Location: Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South. Class size is limited; advanced registration is required.

 

1-1:15pm: Welcome: Jon Petitt, ALM, GSAS Director of Alumni Relations and Publications

 

1:15-2pm:”So You Think You Want to Start a Business…?”

Reinier Beeuwkes, Ph.D., Chairman of Ischemix, Inc.

 

2-2:30pm: “Perspectives on Starting Your Own Company, In or Near Your Area of Expertise, Without Large Amounts of Capital”

Daniel Johnson, AM, GSA, Founder and CEO of American Financial Systems

 

2:30-2:45pm: Break

 

2:45-3:15pm:“A Tale of Two Companies: Two Approaches for Starting Companies in the Life Sciences”

Dennis E. Vaccaro, Ph.D., Co-founder and Chairman of BioPhysics Assay Laboratory

 

3:15-4pm: Panel and Q&A on Starting Your Own Business

Reinier Beeuwkes, Daniel Johnson, Dennis E. Vaccaro, and Laura Stark (OCS)

A great number of disciplines involve teaching students about stuff that’s just plain hard to see.  Whether it’s too small (electron orbitals), too big or too far way (Saturn’s rings), too old (a floor-plan of a 17th C. Theatre), too dangerous (undersea volcanos), or even too abstract (a logical map of Hegel’s Phenomenology) . . . you get the picture.  2D and 3D animation provide powerful tools for the teacher and scholar, and the Bok Center is looking for a number of brave teacher/scholars who want to leap into the world of graphics and animation in this workshop.  No previous experience is required whatsoever—all are welcome.

The class will work on Mac computers, and the applications we’ll encounter include Photoshop, Illustrator, Motion, After Effects, and Cinema 4D, with C4D being the main focus of the course.  The Bok Center has machines you can use, and we have enough student licenses for participants enrolled in the class to install C4D on their computers for the duration of the term.  All we ask in return is that you create a final project over the course of the term that we can share with the wider world of teachers and scholars interested in your work.

Schedule: We will meet for 3 intensive days during the J-term (Tuesday, Jan 20 - Thursday, Jan 22, from 9:00-12:00), and you will have the entire Spring term to work at the Bok Center on your projects at your leisure (think of yourself as a graphical artist in residence!).  We will have a final meeting in early May to screen your final projects.  Limited to 8 students.  RSVP for this workshop here.

How do you respond when someone asks you what you are working on? How can you describe your high-level research to your introductory students? Do you struggle to get out of the weeds and explain the big picture? In this highly interactive workshop led by Bok Center Associate Director Pamela Pollock, you will get an overview of some essential skills for communicating your research and connecting with your audience. By focusing on both content and delivery, you will learn and practice how to explain your research to a non-specialist audience. RSVP for this workshop here.

Student evaluations are the most common method to assess teaching, partly because the measurement is easy to interpret and they take little time to administer. However, as we know, teaching evaluations like the Q guide have their limitations in that they are summative in nature, are often too broad or too general in the types of information they solicit from students in order to allow for benchmarking,  do not link to individual course learning goals and most importantly are often used as the sole source of data to judge the efficacy of a course.

 An important feature of effective evaluation is the use of multiple sources of data.  This technique offers numerous advantages, the most important of which is a more realistic picture of classroom success upon which to build realistic improvement. In this workshop we will explore two additional feedback approaches to evaluating course success- tailor- made surveys and focus groups. This workshop will cover the basic elements of designing and evaluating questionnaires including how to administer surveys via Qualtrics. The second half of the workshop will be dedicated to focus groups, including  designing protocols, recruiting participants and illustrating how to execute and hone skills to moderate. RSVP for this workshop here.

Communicating in a culture other than your own is not just about knowing the language and cultural norms. It’s also about connecting. In this workshop, designed for International Teaching Fellows (and the first of a series of communication skills workshops for international students this spring), you will gain practical and important skills for communicating your ideas more effectively with others.  This session will be led by Lee Warren, Associate Director Emerita of the Derek Bok Center and Director of Professional Pedagogy Emerita, Harvard Kennedy School and Virginia Maurer, Associate Director at the Derek Bok Center. RSVP for this workshop here.

Wondering how technology can support best practices in teaching, learning, and administration of FAS courses? Looking for some expert advice for courses you’re teaching? Join experts from the Academic Technology Group (ATG) and Bok Center for this interactive session.

You should be prepared to:

  • Explore the technologies that support teaching and learning in FAS courses, with examples from a variety of courses and disciplines
  • Consult with your colleagues, facilitated by ATG and Bok Center staff, to identify techniques, tools, and approaches you can apply in your courses

 You may want to bring:

  • Your computer
  • Syllabi for courses you’re teaching, or have taught
  • Your questions, ideas, concerns, fears, excitement, and ambivalence about technology in courses!

RSVP for this workshop here.

This 2-hour session on using the libraries to improve your teaching will provide hands-on activities to help you learn how you can work with library material and staff to keep your students engaged and energized.  Odile Harter, a Research Librarian in the Harvard Libraries, will lead this session.  

PART I: finding & incorporating primary materials into the classroom

- Tips on navigating Harvard's collections

- Thinking creatively about what to bring in to class (special collections, video and image subscriptions, etc,)

- The pedagogy of primary materials: beyond the "wow" factor, how can you use primary materials to deepen learning? 

PART II: tips for helping your students succeed on (and enjoy!) their research assignments

- Highlights from the latest findings on how students do research

- Research assignment checklist: a review of the skills that students most struggle with in doing research

- Research assignment Rx: tips & brainstorming on easy ways to scaffold those skills and guarantee yourself an end-of-semester stack of interesting, engaging, academically honest assignments that will teach you something new.


RSVP for this session here.

This whirlwind introduction to teaching sections and labs in the sciences, mathematics and engineering will give you concrete examples of effective strategies, tips for your first day of class, ways to plan great sections throughout the semester, advice on grading, and even a glimpse at the puzzling inner world of student learning. Through live and video examples, hands­-on exercises, and never­-a­-dull moment discussion, you’ll leave with a well­-stocked teaching toolbox. RSVP for this workshop here.

In the humanities and social sciences fundamentals track, we will devote our time to the activities on which TFs in these disciplines spend most of their teaching time: leading discussion and grading papers. By the end of the day’s sessions, you will have encountered a variety of tactics and strategies for excelling in your first terms as a TF. RSVP for this event here.

Jobs in academia increasingly require a teaching portfolio as part of the application process. In this workshop, led by Terry Aladjem of the Derek Bok Center, we will consider ways of becoming a reflective practitioner, how you might document and present your teaching credentials, and how to prepare a teaching statement by examining samples. RSVP for this workshop here.

You may have heard a lot about the General Education Program and wonder how teaching for Gen Ed might differ from teaching departmental courses. What are the aims of General Education and how does that affect what is taught and how it is taught? What challenges and interesting experiences might you encounter when you teach for a course in the program? What will it be like to teach students outside your disciplinary area, or possibly to teach an interdisciplinary course? This luncheon session, led by Associate Director in General Education Laura Hess, will introduce you to Gen Ed and offer you pedagogical strategies to help you and your students make the most of this exciting new curriculum.  

Please bring to the session a copy of your course description that you can share with someone else electronically or in hard copy. Note: Lunch will be served. RSVP for this workshop here.

Part of becoming a teacher is developing a professional role. In this session, we will discuss a number of questions related to that role: What are the implications of having authority? What kind of relationship should one have with students? How do you treat your students fairly and equally? What about confidentiality?  Assistant Dean Brett Flehinger will lead this session.  RSVP for this workshop here.

Get a head start on your financial security. Personal Finance Management provides an introduction to essential information and skills for a lifetime of successful money management. The program features a variety of experts and guest speakers who will provide students with an understanding of consumer credit cards, credit scores, budgeting, financial planning, insurance, taxes, and marketplace investing. Using case studies, students will connect the principles of personal financial management with their own finances and goals. Q & A with a panel of recent graduates will also be held. This program is in its fourth year and is very popular. Through daily surveys of participants, we've be able to adapt the program to specific needs of those who attend. Want to learn the top steps for proper investing? Wondering how you will manage your money? Please complete this registration survey to enroll for the course. Contact Laura Buso with any questions.

Get firsthand experience of the acclaimed Toastmasters International program to develop public speaking and leadership skills. Observe and participate in a regular meeting. Learn how Toastmasters can help you to become a more effective communicator starting the first day you attend. Please visit our website here for more information.

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Arts, Culture, and Recreation

It seems that the standard for tax information exchange developed by the OECD has been launched because of FATCA, but there are some questions that we will try to answer: Did FATCA really create such revolution? Is the convention superior to the IGAs?

An interdisciplinary workshop to get familiarized with the kaleidoscopic West African paradigm, its postcolonial context and the socio-cultural aspects brightly portrayed by the francophone voice of Ken Bugul, one of the most representative African female writers. The workshop presents an opportunity to gain academic skills for a better analysis and deeper understanding of the West African universes in an exchange of emerging ideas and multidisciplinary knowledge.

Through three lectures, this course offer a vision of the importance of Harvard University for the study of Medieval Art. The first lecture examines the history and importance of the Medieval art collection at the Harvard Museums, the second lecture introduces students to the meanings and conservation project of one of the masterpieces of medieval art, The Portal of Glory of the Cathedral of Santiago; the third lecture introduces students to the Santiago Cathedral Project, one of the most ambitious projects of research and conservation currently underway in major monument in Europe. The headquarters of this project are now at Harvard University (Real Colegio Complutense) offering students a great opportunity to get involved in the development of interdisciplinary lines of research, for which they can obtain funding through a fellowship program funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Graeco-Roman authors have provided interesting sources for the study of Ancient dance. In this session students will be able to discuss the value of texts as means to approach embodiment and kinesthesia. They will also investigate the differences between the Greek culture of dance and that of the Romans. 

This course is open to anyone interested in learning hip-hop dancing. No prior dance experience is required. The class will focus on rhythm, isolations (movement of a single body part), and choreography seen in past and current dance videos and television shows. You will learn a combination of skills that will allow you to express yourself and take a fun break from work and school! The dance combinations will be to hip-hop, funk, pop, and dance music. In addition, you will learn the art of "muscle memory", retaining fast movements in eight (8) counts for a routine ranging from 1 to 2 minutes. The class will begin with a warm-up and isolation exercises, followed by a dance combination. Each day participants will focus on one dance routine. Please see syllabus here. It is also helpful for the instructor to have a general idea of how many people are interested in attending. Please respond to this survey to express your interest in this workshop.

A unique, no-cost opportunity for GSAS/FAS students to spend a week in guided exploration of Harvard's 3,700-acre outdoor lab and classroom in Petersham, Mass. Daily hands-on activities and field trips led by researchers, artists, and writers will offer a variety of perspectives on environmental topics. Participants MUST attend the full 5.5-day session. Participation is limited to 10. Apply here.

Takes place Sunday, January 18 at 4:00pm THROUGH Friday, January 23 at 7:30pm.

Come and learn how to “read” books as physical objects. A brief introduction to the principles and practice of descriptive bibliography, its significance to textual analysis, and its importance to the study of the history of the book. Enrollment limited to 15. RSVP by 9 January.

The First Folio of Shakespeare is recognized today as one of the greatest books of the Western canon. How did it come to be? This session will examine the cultural, theatrical, political, social, and bibliographic surroundings that influenced its creation. Enrollment limited to 15. RSVP by 9 January.

After a brief discussion of the history and technology of printing from moveable type, participants will set type and, using the iron handpress, print a keepsake to take with them. Enrollment limited to 6. RSVP by 9 January.

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962)  Starring Peter O’Toole as Lawrence.  This stunning film is always on lists of the greatest films ever made.  It concentrates on the Arabian campaign during WWI, focusing on British officer T. E. Lawrence and his experiences.  Great performances, magnificent desert vistas, disturbing political realities…this just begins to describe the wonders of this film.  We will show the film on the new projection equipment in the Common Room, with a new blue-ray DVD, and will have middle eastern food to sustain us for the full 4 hours of the film.  If you have never seen Lawrence this is a great chance to see it; if you have seen this film you will want to see it again.  Please join us in the Common Room at 5:30 p.m.  We’ll gather, get some food, settle in, and start the movie promptly at 6 p.m.

Curious about how a book is made? Join Harvard Library Preservation Services staff to make a book of your very own. Using a historic technique, you will complete a book to use for notes, journaling, or just to impress your friends! All tools and materials provided.

Celebrate with us! PLEASE JOIN US FOR A FESTIVE EXHIBITION RECEPTION. 6th-graders from Mother Caroline Academy will share their Step Into Art paintings and writing inspired by art from the MFA, Boston. Together, we will celebrate the students’ creativity and the 10th anniversary of Step Into Art!

Offered in the centennial year of the Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library, this seminar provides a biographical introduction to Harry Widener, Harvard Class of 1907, and a rare opportunity to examine the magnificent collection of books and manuscripts he formed in his brief lifetime. The class will convene in the historic Widener Memorial Room. Enrollment limited to 10 students. Registration deadline is 9 January.