Seminars, workshops, and recreational opportunities designed especially for GSAS students, to help you build professional skills and make the most of the winter break.
 

Topics:
Student Run Mini-Courses
Professional Development
Arts, Culture, and Recreation

TitleStartEnd
January 11
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
Exploring how new technologies can better serve to democratic regeneration and innovation 8:00 am1:00 pm
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
Improving Presentation and Communication through Improvisation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
Why haven`t we cured cancer yet? Insights from evolution, ecology and paleontology 6:30 pm8:00 pm
January 12
Exploring how new technologies can better serve to democratic regeneration and innovation 8:00 am1:00 pm
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Improving Presentation and Communication through Improvisation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Make Your Own Book 2:00 pm4:30 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Myths of the Mind and Madness - A Scientific Review of Abnormal Psychology 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
January 13
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Exploring how new technologies can better serve to democratic regeneration and innovation 8:00 am1:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
The Whole Hog: A Nose-to-Tail Master Class in Library Research 10:00 am5:00 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
Dissertation Writing Workshop 1:00 pm2:30 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Improving Presentation and Communication through Improvisation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Myths of the Mind and Madness - A Scientific Review of Abnormal Psychology 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
Why haven`t we cured cancer yet? Insights from evolution, ecology and paleontology 6:30 pm8:00 pm
January 14
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Exploring how new technologies can better serve to democratic regeneration and innovation 8:00 am1:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Improving Presentation and Communication through Improvisation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
The Whole Hog: A Nose-to-Tail Master Class in Library Research 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Medical Entrepreneurship: Translating innovative technologies into successful medical ventures 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Houghton Library: Hands-on Letterpress Printing Workshop 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
The Harvard-Spain Connection in the first decades of the Twentieth Century: Scholars, Travelers, Thinkers, Art Dealers, Masterpieces, and Rebels 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Poetic Hermeneutics: Truth, Method, and Declamation 5:00 pm7:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
January 15
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:30 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
Medical Entrepreneurship: Translating innovative technologies into successful medical ventures 10:00 am1:00 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
The Whole Hog: A Nose-to-Tail Master Class in Library Research 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Improving Presentation and Communication through Improvisation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
When Art Makes Music, When Music Makes Art… 3:00 pm5:00 pm
The Harvard-Spain Connection in the first decades of the Twentieth Century: Scholars, Travelers, Thinkers, Art Dealers, Masterpieces, and Rebels 3:00 pm5:00 pm
The Macabre as a Way of Life: Morbid Anatomies and the Grim Side of New England 5:00 pm7:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
Why haven`t we cured cancer yet? Insights from evolution, ecology and paleontology 6:30 pm8:00 pm
January 16
Kizomba Dance Workshop 1:00 pm2:00 pm
January 17
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
January 18
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
When Art Makes Music, When Music Makes Art… 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
January 19
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Winter Teaching Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Learning how to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
Science and Public Policy 10:00 am12:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
How to Make a Book: a Practical and Historical Overview 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Houghton Library: Graphic Techniques 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Boot Camp on Writing Fellowship Proposals in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Myths of the Mind and Madness - A Scientific Review of Abnormal Psychology 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Animation + Revolution: World Cinema and the Animated Avant-Garde 6:00 pm9:00 pm
January 20
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Winter Teaching Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
Learning how to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
Science and Public Policy 10:00 am12:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
How to Make a Book: a Practical and Historical Overview 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
When Art Makes Music, When Music Makes Art… 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Sacred Harp Singing 3:00 pm5:30 pm
Myths of the Mind and Madness - A Scientific Review of Abnormal Psychology 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Win Over the Employer: How to Interview Effectively 4:00 pm5:00 pm
Introduction to Argentine Tango: Culture, Music, and the Dance 4:00 pm7:00 pm
Kizomba Dance Workshop 5:00 pm6:00 pm
Why haven`t we cured cancer yet? Insights from evolution, ecology and paleontology 6:30 pm8:00 pm
January 21
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Winter Teaching Week 12:00 am12:00 am
Advanced Course on European Union Law and Government 8:00 am12:00 pm
Learning how to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:30 am4:30 pm
Science and Public Policy 10:00 am12:00 pm
The European Union Fundamental Rights System and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The American Perspective 1:00 pm7:00 pm
Houghton Library: Introduction to Analytical Bibliography 1:00 pm3:00 pm
The Aesthetics of Academic Writing: All This Useful Beauty 1:30 pm3:00 pm
MagicalMonstrous: Fantastical Adolescence in Japanese Animation 2:00 pm5:00 pm
How to Make a Book: a Practical and Historical Overview 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Myths of the Mind and Madness - A Scientific Review of Abnormal Psychology 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Zotero Advanced Workshop 3:00 pm4:30 pm
The Aesthetics of Academic Writing: Attracting Readers and Influencing Reviewers 3:00 pm4:30 pm
The Catalan Connection: Constructing the Catalan Countries through Architecture, 1950s-1980s 5:30 pm6:30 pm
Introduction to Argentine Tango: Culture, Music, and the Dance 7:00 pm10:00 pm
January 22
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
Winter Teaching Week 12:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Winter Session Mindfulness Retreat 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break Week 12:00 am12:00 am
The Beasts Within 12:00 am12:00 am
Learning how to lead collaborative governance initiatives to create public value 8:00 am1:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Strategy Consulting 9:00 am12:00 pm
Houghton Library: Shakespeare and His First Folio in Context 10:00 am12:00 pm
New Wave Cinema in Post-Communist Romania 10:00 am12:00 pm
Science and Public Policy 10:00 am12:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Finance 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Frames of History: Contemporary Politics through Korean Film 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Ghosts in the Machine: Computers and Film 2:00 pm4:00 pm
How to Make a Book: a Practical and Historical Overview 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Why a public-private partnership is successful or not? 2:00 pm7:00 pm
When Art Makes Music, When Music Makes Art… 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Introduction to Argentine Tango: Culture, Music, and the Dance 4:00 pm7:00 pm
Poincaré, Heisenberg, Gödel: Some Limits of Scientific Knowledge 5:30 pm6:30 pm
Why haven`t we cured cancer yet? Insights from evolution, ecology and paleontology 6:30 pm8:00 pm
January 23
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 12:00 am12:00 am
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
Business Applications Workshop: Big Data 9:00 am12:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Advice from Recent Graduates 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Kizomba Dance Workshop 1:00 pm2:00 pm
How to Make a Book: a Practical and Historical Overview 2:00 pm3:30 pm
Introduction to Argentine Tango: Culture, Music, and the Dance 4:00 pm7:00 pm
Business Applications Workshop: Networking Reception 4:00 pm5:00 pm
January 24
Dudley House Ski Trip 2016 12:00 am12:00 am
Student Run Mini-Courses

This course is designed for students interested in learning more about the intersection between science and public policy. Members of the GSAS Science Policy Group will be teaching and coordinating the class with the assistance of guest speaker Randy Salzman, journalist and communications professor specializing in policy issues. Students will have the opportunity to engage with current issues at the intersection between science and policy in multiple ways, including analyzing real-life case studies, creating a policy agenda, and brainstorming op-ed articles. Please sign-up for this course here.

 From tomb inscriptions in Ancient Egypt to the Kindle sitting in your hand, books have taken many forms over the history of humanity. In this course, learn how to books came to be: how language and writing evolved in our ancestors, how ancient human societies recorded information, how technology for the preservation of information developed (from papyrus to movable type), and how the meaning of “book” is changing before our eyes in the digital age. Conclude by learning how to make your own hand-bound book over a series of three workshops, using traditional materials and techniques.

January 19, 20, 21, 22, 23: 2:00-3:30 (with optional discussion 3:30-5:00)

The lectures and discussions are open to anyone (Jan 19, 20), but the book-making workshops (Jan 21, 22, 23) are limited enrollment due to material cost.

Enroll here

The course seeks to examine contemporary South Korean films that have presented interesting questions with regards to modern history, and/or sparked debate in contemporary politics. Participants will be able to learn about modern Korean history and politics all while watching some very good movies.

This course aims to give an introduction to improvisation as a foundation for a variety of presentational and communication skills. Giving a talk, teaching a course, and participating in a discussion all benefit from improved clarity, specificity, and accessibility, all of which are skills that spring directly from improvisational training. No experience necessary! This class is entirely based on participation, so come ready to perform (only for each other.) January 11-15 (MTWThF) 1-3pm, location TBD.

This course is open to everyone! However, due to the limitations of this format, the class will be capped 14. Enroll here.

THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

 

Taking into account that collaborative governance is becoming omnipresent in public institutions, this course is focused on training people interested to lead intergovernmental collaboration processes, public-private partnerships and policy networks. We will put in practice the competences needed to properly initiate, implement and assess collaborative governance initiatives.

THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

 

In the context of the current debate about public service design and delivery regimes, in this course we are going to review the institutional and organizational capabilities required to properly manage and increase the chances of success of a public-private partnership.

In light of new developments in communication technology that make direct democracy technically feasible in a mass society, it exists a crucial debate about the challenges of introducing E-democracy. In this course we will explore real experiences about how new technologies can better serve to democratic regeneration and innovation.

This course will look at four contemporary Romanian films. Following the fall of communism in 1989, Romanian cinema experienced a revival, consolidating in the 2000s an austere, realist and often-minimalist style to great international acclaim. The films covered by this course deal with: the revolution of 1989; communism in the 1980s; the collapse of public services during democracy; and everyday life in present day Romania. The course will pay equal attention to subject matter and aesthetics in order to explore how these films are representing the 21st century Romanian experience, and pushing the boundaries of international cinema.

Dates: 11 January – 22 January

Times: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 10am-12pm (plus four screenings)

Location: tbd

Enroll here.

This discussion-based course explores select themes in the cultural history of the computer through an examination of classic and not-so familiar cinematic representations of computers and selected readings from computer pioneers, philosophers, historians, and science fiction authors. Films offer a window into the wider cultural life of computer devices: as banal machines, imaginative technologies, and objects of criticism and philosophical contemplation.

The class alternates between discussions and in-class screenings, meeting January 11-22: MTWThF in Science Center 469 (with no meeting on the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday). 

Enroll here.

Despite the high prevalence rates of psychological disorders in the United States, the topic of mental health is frequently misrepresented in the media and popular culture. This mini-course, offered by two advanced graduate students in the clinical psychology doctoral program, is designed to provide a practical perspective of abnormal psychology as informed by scientific research. Goals of this course will be (1) to introduce a range of mental health disorders, (2) to dispel common myths about psychopathology and psychotherapy, and (3) to provide an introduction to the leading evidence-based interventions for mental illness.

January 12-13, 19-21 from 3-5pm in William James Hall, Room TBD. This class is open to everyone.

Enroll here

What if the Harvard Art Museums had a musical accompaniment? If every instance of visual artistic expression had a sonic, a musical, analog? How would one go about realizing this project? In what ways to visual art and music in create, inform, make each other? What technology is required? What paratextual information? Is this a meaningful enterprise? What are the precedents? What are the downfalls? Join us as we explore possible answers to these questions in pursuit of a larger project: the curation of a playlist for the Harvard Art Museums. 

January 15, 18, 20, 22, 3pm-5pm in Harvard Art Museums and Harvard Music Department, Paine Hall, Room 4. Optional field trips on January 16, 19 and 21.   

This course is open to everyone but pre-registration is recommended as we will need to contact you about some logistics. Enroll here

Animals are never alone: inside and out, our bodies are home to an incredible number diversity of other organisms. In this course, we will cover just what our microscopic tenants are doing, and why it matters. Many of these organisms are harmful to their animal host: we will discuss pathogens of humans, feminizing parasites in arthropods, the Alien-chest-burster-like habits of parasitoid wasps, and more. But there are beneficial symbionts, too! Many animals rely on bacteria to help them digest their food, escape their predators, colonize harsh environments, or fight off competitors. We will discuss both harmful and beneficial symbionts, as well as how the line between the two is often blurry.
MWF, January 11th through 22nd
 
Enroll here.

This course attempts a broad survey of animation in the global context of the avant-garde, with a particular emphasis on the former USSR and Japan, as well as former Czechoslovakia, the US, and the UK. In particular, the course looks at a fascinating range of animations that are often unknown to contemporary audiences, especially those which might seem a little strange, or a little “off”-modern: films such as Svankmajer's Alice (1988), Yuri Norstein's Hedgehog in the Fog (1975), or Yamamoto Eichii's Belladonna of Sadness (1973). The films shown in class are often surreal or bizarre, yet always visually mesmerizing and aesthetically revolutionary. After screening films, the class will discuss such questions as: why did these directors choose animation over live action as a mode of expression? How was the form of each film affected by its political climate? How can both the form and content of an animation be politicized, and what does it mean for an animation to be truly “avant-garde”? Such concepts will be considered in what aspires to be both a relaxing night watching films, accompanied by dinner (brought by one's self) and/or light snacks (provided), and an intriguing discussion about the revolutionary potential of animation. Jan 11-15, 18-19. 6-9 PM Location: Dana Palmer Seminar Room

Enroll here

Every passing second an American dies of cancer. Why is this disease so hard to cure? Evolution, ecology, and paleontology offer us new paradigms to tackle this complex problem. We will explore what geographical speciation of birds can teach us about metastasis, how studying species extinction can help us design more potent and less toxic cancer treatments, why new immunotherapies are successful despite tumor heterogeneity, and how post-apocalyptic TV shows like The Walking Dead parallel emergence of drug resistance.

January 11, 13, 15, 20, 22, 6.30-8 PM room TBD.

Enroll here.

This course is an intensive introduction to, and immersion in, the culture, history, music, and dance of one of Latin America’s richest art forms, Tango Argentino: the fabulous dance of the past hundred years and, according to Martha Graham, the most beautiful. It combines intellectual study of tango with daily dance lessons and studio training offering a progressive introduction to tango salón. 
 
Open to all. No experience or partner required!
 
Dates: January 20 -- 23
 
Time: 
4-7pm on January 20, 22, 23
7-10pm on January 21 
 
Location: TBD**
 
Enroll  here

Japanese animation, or anime, is a pop-culture phenomenon that has captured international attention. Across the world, fans of various ages, ethnicities, creeds, and socioeconomic backgrounds clamor for anime media and merchandise. Creative in ways both narrative and aesthetic, anime offers audiences a unique experience worthy of academic consideration. Acknowledging anime’s cultural and economic importance, this course attempts to dig deeply into a significant facet of the art form: gender and adolescence are indelible in anime. Grounded in cultural anthropology and media studies, this course explores how anime serves as a critical artistic negotiation of these gender, youth, and sexuality. As a class, we will investigate anime as an art form that reflects Japanese sexuality and gender norms, but also offers moments of resistant renegotiation with such norms. Classes will cover a range of topics, including, though not limited to, childhood and adolescence in Japan, the history of anime, gender theory, gender and sexuality in Japan, and the sci-fi and fantasy genres. Screened media will include: Bishōjo Senshi Sērā Mūn/Sailor Moon, Shōjo Kakumei Utena/Revolutionary Girl Utena, Ranma 1/2, Shingeki no Kyojin/Attack on Titan, Shin Seiki Evangerion/Neon Genesis Evangelion, Akira, Mahō Shōjo Madoka Magika/ Puella Magi Madoka Magica, RahXephon, Tetsuo, Gandamu Wingu/Gundam Wing, Den'ei Shōjo/Video Girl Ai, Bugīpoppu wa Warawanai Boogiepop Phantom. No experience with Japanese language or media is required.

 
Times: January 11-15 and 18-22, 2pm-5pm
Location: Tozzer 203
 
Enroll here
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Professional Development

Participants will be given hands-on training to visualize microbes using various microscopy techniques, including light, fluorescence, confocal, electron (TEM and SEM) and atomic force microscopy. The workshop will also provide an opportunity to interact with MSI faculty and fellow members of the graduate consortium, both scientifically and socially.

You have an interview. Now what? This workshop will discuss the different types of interviews, what hiring managers look for, and tips on how to answer tough questions. Please register through Crimson Careers: https://harvard-csm.symplicity.com/students/.

THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

 

This provides a brief ‘how-to’ for students with an interest in starting a medical company. Coverage ranges from the initial challenge of translating a technology idea into a working business case, through securing angel investment, business development, partnering, FDA approvals and regulatory requirements. Speakers will include senior business leaders, CEOs and VCs.

A quiet space to write (or study) with self-serve coffee and snacks. Website: http://bsc.harvard.edu/pages/study-write-5-linden.

For doctoral students. Consider how to orient to the nature and scope of your inquiry; how to write when feeling overwhelmed, lost, daunted, or discouraged; and how to manage time, anxiety, energy, and tasks. Website: http://bsc.harvard.edu/event/dissertation-writing-workshop-2

The program is designed for Harvard graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty who want to learn spatial analysis and apply GIS methods in their research. No previous GIS training required, but you must have familiarity with MS Office and Internet usage. Through the nine days, participants are introduced to geographic information science and technology; spatial data development, management, and manipulation; spatial analysis concepts, tools, and procedures; hands-on use of ArcGIS and similar software; tours of GIS resources on campus, guest speakers from diverse disciplines introducing research with GIS in their fields; and one-on-one consultation and step-by-step guidance through the participants’ individual projects. The last day of the program is a conference format devoted to students' project presentations.

This 3-day hands-on master class offers you a chance to explore the full research lifecycle and set yourself up for a lifelong scholarly practice--making you a more effective, resourceful, and creative researcher. Bring your appetite! Lunch will be provided, but space is limited. You may register at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/12Vcm4cyNX5CUnZqPDsfkUmPyOTkdtW8LR3Ng8YHbomE/viewform?usp=send_form.

Students receive feedback on their own proposal writing and also offer the same to their fellow students. Participants are asked to bring a draft of their opening paragraph of a fellowship proposal (with 25 copies). The session is intended for students in the humanities and social sciences. Pre-registration is required by emailing Cynthia Verba at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Already familiar with Zotero but want to make sure you are getting the most out of it? Come ready to talk about using Zotero for research organization and to learn about advanced features in Zotero such as:

▪ How Zotero translators work with websites

▪ Handling unusual citations in Zotero

▪ Using tags, saved searches, and keyboard shortcuts

▪ Storage options

▪ And more, depending on your interests!

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL.

Please contact Suzanne Smith regarding a possible repeated offering of this workshop later this semester.

 

The Aesthetics of Academic Writing

As it pertains to writing, the language of attention-seeking overlaps with that of compulsion. Something about the way that an article or a book is written “grabs” our attention or “captures” it, suggesting that it does so unawares. How much if at all, after all, do we need to think or understand in order to be grabbed or caught? Academic writing characteristically or notoriously neglects the demands of attracting attention in favor of satisfying the requirements of scholarly judgment. But we need not sacrifice narrative, rhetoric or, more broadly speaking, design, in order to make our work more compelling in scholarly terms.

Indeed, these two JTERM workshops test the assumption that stylistically attractive writing may serve as an eminently practical feature of theoretically compelling work. To be sure, an elegant piece of writing may lack much in terms of theory or content but when theoretically compelling work utterly lacks rhetorical elegance, it is that much harder to discern its intellectual elegance. How do you know that work is good if it reads poorly? It is one thing to make your work correct in terms of presentation (this is the domain of proofreading) but the aesthetics of academic writing may seem much more elusive. With the aid of some resources borrowed from the visual and literary arts, these two workshops seek to demystify them. You can only master style to the extent that you are able to identify it, both in your own work and in that of others.

 

1. All This Useful Beauty

In this workshop we will acquaint ourselves with some basic principles of 2-D design, and explore the way in which these principles function with respect to writing. Learn how to create a dominant element, how to establish relations between that element and the rest of the composition, and how to manipulate line and frames. Emphasis on shape, weight, direction, and contrast. No experience required.

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL.

Please contact Suzanne Smith regarding a possible repeated offering of this workshop later this semester.

 

The Aesthetics of Academic Writing

As it pertains to writing, the language of attention-seeking overlaps with that of compulsion. Something about the way that an article or a book is written “grabs” our attention or “captures” it, suggesting that it does so unawares. How much if at all, after all, do we need to think or understand in order to be grabbed or caught? Academic writing characteristically or notoriously neglects the demands of attracting attention in favor of satisfying the requirements of scholarly judgment. But we need not sacrifice narrative, rhetoric or, more broadly speaking, design, in order to make our work more compelling in scholarly terms.

Indeed, these two JTERM workshops test the assumption that stylistically attractive writing may serve as an eminently practical feature of theoretically compelling work. To be sure, an elegant piece of writing may lack much in terms of theory or content but when theoretically compelling work utterly lacks rhetorical elegance, it is that much harder to discern its intellectual elegance. How do you know that work is good if it reads poorly? It is one thing to make your work correct in terms of presentation (this is the domain of proofreading) but the aesthetics of academic writing may seem much more elusive. With the aid of some resources borrowed from the visual and literary arts, these two workshops seek to demystify them. You can only master style to the extent that you are able to identify it, both in your own work and in that of others.

 

2. Attracting Readers and Influencing Reviewers

In this workshop we will analyze and develop strategies for heightening the audience-appeal of pieces of academic writing. Please plan to a piece of your own writing in advance to be shared with other members of the workshop. We will work as well with selected pieces of academic writing from a number of different disciplines. The contrast between different genres of writing, and the features of academic writing relative to other genres will also be considered. 

With exciting and successful careers outside of academia, GSAS alumni will share their insights in four half-day workshops. This is the fifth year for this popular event; sponsored by the GSAS Alumni Association Council.

An excellent career exploration opportunity for GSAS students and recent graduates, you will hear about experiences and advice from successful alumni speakers. The workshops will also provide a very unique opportunity to ask these alumni for career advice.

 

Agenda

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.: Welcome        
Mia de Kuijper, MPA ’83, PhD ’83, economics, GSAS Alumni Association Council
Karen Hladik, PhD ’84, business economics, GSAS Alumni Association Council

9:15 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.: “Strategy in a Connected World”
Mia de Kuijper, MPA ’83, PhD ’83, economics, CEO of Cambridge Partners, former Senior Managing Director on Wall Street and Chief Strategist at Pepsi-Cola Int’l

9:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.: “Consulting and Specialization”
Ann Bennett Spence, AM ’69, East Asia studies, Managing Director, Cambridge Associates, LLC

10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.: Break

10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.: “Translating Your Talent and Skills to Client Engagements”
Marianne Steiner, SM ’78, MEN ‘78, Founder and Principal of Larkspur Marketing

11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.: “Making Strategy Actionable”
Alan Kantrow, PhD ’79, history of American civilization, Senior Advisor at The Governance Lab @NYU and former Senior Partner and Chief Knowledge Officer at Monitor Group

11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Strategy Consulting
Mia de Kuijper, Ann Bennett Spence, Marianne Steiner, Alan Kantrow, and Heather Law (OCS)

With exciting and successful careers outside of academia, GSAS alumni will share their insights in four half-day workshops. This is the fifth year for this popular event; sponsored by the GSAS Alumni Association Council.

An excellent career exploration opportunity for GSAS students and recent graduates, you will hear about experiences and advice from successful alumni speakers. The workshops will also provide a very unique opportunity to ask these alumni for career advice.

 

Agenda

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.: Welcome        
Karen Hladik, PhD ’84, business economics, GSAS Alumni Association Council
Mia de Kuijper, MPA ’83, PhD ’83, economics, GSAS Alumni Association Council

1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.: “Investment Banking”
Kenneth Froewiss, PhD ’77, economics, Chair of the Deutsche Funds and former Managing Director in the Financial Institutions Group at J.P. Morgan

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.: “Careers in Private Equity and Venture Capital”
John J. Moon, PhD ’94, business economics, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Merchant Banking & Real Estate Investing

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.: Break

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.: “Equity Markets, Risk, and Return”
Karen Hladik, PhD ’84, business economics, Quantitative Specialist and former Global Head of Risk & Quantitative Services for GSS at Goldman Sachs & Co.

3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Finance
Kenneth Froewiss, John Moon, Karen Hladik, Mia de Kuijper, and Heather Law (OCS)

 

With exciting and successful careers outside of academia, GSAS alumni will share their insights in four half-day workshops. This is the fifth year for this popular event; sponsored by the GSAS Alumni Association Council.

An excellent career exploration opportunity for GSAS students and recent graduates, you will hear about experiences and advice from successful alumni speakers. The workshops will also provide a very unique opportunity to ask these alumni for career advice.

 

Agenda

9:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.: Welcome
Marianne Steiner, SM ‘78, MEN ‘78, GSAS Alumni Association Council

9:15 a.m. -  9:35 a.m.: "Creating World-Class Analytic Capability in Industry"
Russell Baris, SM '81, engineering & applied science, President, eLumindata
Russell built one of the first Data Science teams in U.S. industry while at Pfizer. He now leads a company that is developing new Data Science tools. He will share insights from 19 years of experience on how data science can lead to outstanding analytic impact.

9:35 a.m. - 9:55 a.m.: “From Psychology to Data Science at Amazon”
Manizeh Khan, PhD ‘13, psychology, Data Scientist, Amazon
When I was finishing my PhD in Psychology in the Spring of 2013, I didn't know what I wanted to do next.  I enjoyed thinking about human cognition and behavior and I enjoyed playing with data. Eventually, I found my way to Amazon where I am a Data Scientist working on their speech platform, for products such as Echo and Fire TV. I spend my days looking at how customers interact with Alexa, the voice-based personal assistant, and seeing how we can use the data to improve the customer experience. In my section, I'll talk about the path getting to where I am now, both from before getting to Amazon and since starting here, and also talk a bit about the day-to-day in my current role.

9:55 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.: “Data Science Meets Energy Efficiency”
Elizabeth Main, PhD ‘12, physics, Data Scientist, EnerNOC
You need data and smart people to measure whether energy efficiency improvements have saved you money. Building software to do this economically for many buildings requires an army of software developers. But doing this accurately across a wide range of industries while managing a host of complicating factors and convincing skeptical regulators? For that you need Data Scientists.

10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.: Break

10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.: “Cultivating Domain Diversity in Data Science: From Astronomy to Hollywood
Nathan Sanders, PhD ‘14, astronomy, Sr. Director of Quantitative Analytics, Legendary Entertainment
The growth in digital data collection and the remarkable pace of development of statistical methodologies has led to a rapid expansion in the domains where data analysis is being demanded and deployed.  Cultivating inter-disciplinary diversity has therefore become a highly valuable aspect of preparation for a successful career in data science, suggesting that graduate students seek experiences outside their primary course of study.  I'll describe my own path from Harvard Astronomy (PhD '14) to the Hollywood film studio Legendary Entertainment, and the developmental opportunities that I took advantage of while a GSAS student.

10:50 a.m. - 11:10 a.m.: “Cool Kids Club Theory: On Being A Good Fit for All Kinds of Data Science Teams”
Phil Enock, PhD ‘15, psychology, Data Science Engineer/Data Scientist, Wayfair.com
As GSAS students, you already know how to deeply master a specialized field. But employers all seek some ineffable "good fit" and expect a zillion skills from data science job candidates, clarified not one bit by jargon-packed job postings. This irreverent talk aims to open up the club to you, with ideas on how to make sense of diverse yet oddly specific interviews, how to bridge the gap between your training and others', and how to study up for a transition into data science.

11:10 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Panel and Q&A on “Big Data”
Marianne Steiner, Russell Baris, Manizeh Khan, Elizabeth Main, Nathan Sanders, Phil Enock, and Laura Stark (OCS)

With exciting and successful careers outside of academia, GSAS alumni will share their insights in four half-day workshops. This is the fifth year for this popular event; sponsored by the GSAS Alumni Association Council.

An excellent career exploration opportunity for GSAS students and recent graduates, you will hear about experiences and advice from successful alumni speakers. The workshops will also provide a very unique opportunity to ask these alumni for career advice.

 

Agenda

1:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.: Welcome        
Cherie Ramirez, PhD ’12, medical sciences, GSAS Alumni Association Council
Cammi Valdez, PhD ’14, medical sciences, GSAS Alumni Association Council

1:15 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.: “The Garden Path: Looking Beyond the Hedge, and Stepping on the Flowers”
Patrick Rich, AM ’15, linguistics, Design Strategist Apprentice at Story + Structure, previously Boston City Manager at cove.is

1:35 p.m. - 1:55 p.m.: Transitioning from a Ph.D. in the Sciences to Intellectual Property
Amanda McFedries, PhD ’14, molecular & cellular biology, Patent Law, previously postdoc at Warp Drive (start-up)

1:55 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.: “Perspectives on Management Consulting from a Non-MBA Background”
George Ye, PhD ’13, SEAS, Consultant, McKinsey & Co.

2:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.: Break

2:30 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.: “Careers as a Scientist in the Pharmaceutical Industry”
Whitney Nolte, PhD ’11, chemistry & chemical biology, Senior Scientist, Pfizer, Inc.

2:50 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.:Navigating the Non-Tenure Track: Post-Doctorate but not a Post-Doc!
Anouska Bhattacharya, PhD ’14, history of science, Lecturer History and Literature (non-tenure track) and Resident Coordinator Quad Houses

3:10 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.: Panel and Q&A on Recent Graduates Workshop
Cherie Ramirez, Patrick Rich, Amanda McFedries, George Ye, Whitney Nolte, Anouska Bhattacharya, and Laura Stark (OCS)

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Recent Graduates Networking and Reception in the Graduate Student Lounge at Dudley House

With exciting and successful careers outside of academia, GSAS alumni will share their insights in four half-day workshops. This is the fifth year for this popular event; sponsored by the GSAS Alumni Association Council.

An excellent career exploration opportunity for GSAS students and recent graduates, you will hear about experiences and advice from successful alumni speakers. The workshops will also provide a very unique opportunity to ask these alumni for career advice.

Bok Winter Teaching Week is a series of intensive workshops offered during J-Term in conjunction with January@GSAS directed toward graduate student teachers at different stages in their teaching careers. These workshops, planned for January 19-22, feature specialists from the Bok Center and other units at Harvard and span a variety of subject areas, including: communication, professional development, multimedia production, teaching fundamentals and teaching in the American classroom.

Please visit the Winter Teaching Week page on the Bok Center website for more information on sessions and to enroll for the workshop(s) of your choice.

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Arts, Culture, and Recreation

“Picasso's ‘Guernica’ Borrowed by Fogg Art Museum For Two Weeks. Picture One of Artist's Most Spectacular Works” (October 1, 1941). With this headline, the Harvard Crimson announced the arrival to campus of one of the most emblematic visual testimonies of the Spanish civil war. For two weeks, the Guernica was exhibited at the Fogg Museum alongside an extraordinary collection of artworks from Spain, dating back to the Middle Ages – a collection that had been assembled in the previous decades through the efforts of eminent Harvard professors such as A. Kingsley Porter and Chandler R. Post. The intellectual engagement of Harvard scholars with the art and culture of Spain – reflected not only in their scholarship but also in letters with Spanish colleagues and journalistic documents –, coincided with a crucial historical moment in the political, cultural, and artistic life of that country, which was at the forefront of central aspects in the development of avant-garde movements in Europe, and also became a battlefield in the fight against fascism. A unique educational institution in Madrid, known as the “Residencia de Estudiantes” (the Student’s Residence) embodied the vibrant cultural life of pre-civil war Spain.  Its resident students, among whom were poet Federico García Lorca, painter Salvador Dalí, filmmaker Luis Buñuel, and scientist and Nobel prize winner, Severo Ochoa, shared a rich intellectual life that fostered creativity, excellence and freedom, enjoying at the same time the recurrent presence of invited lecturers such as Albert Einstein, Paul Valéry, Marie Curie, Igor Stravinsky, John M. Keynes, Alexander Calder, Walter Gropius, Henri Bergson and Le Corbusier. In a series of two lectures, each followed by a seminar discussion, where a wealth of documentary and visual material from the Harvard archives and from archives in Spain will be analyzed, this course introduces students to this crucial historical moment of the Harvard-Spain connection, delving into the biography of its most prominent figures, stories, and artworks.

Come and learn how to “read” books as physical objects – more than just the words they contain. A brief introduction to the principles and practice of descriptive bibliography, its significance to textual analysis, and its importance to the study of the history of the book.

Learn how to identify and distinguish between woodcuts, engravings, lithographs, and other processes by which printed pictures have been produced. By looking at illustrations in books students will examine different kinds of prints and see examples of the material artifacts, such as book blocks and copperplates, used to make them. 

The First Folio of Shakespeare has long been acknowledged as one of the greatest book of the Western canon. How did this come to be? This two-hour seminar will examine the cultural, theatrical, political, social, and bibliographic surroundings that influenced its creation. Come and celebrate Shakespeare at Houghton Library as the world marks the 400th anniversary of his death in 2016.

After a brief discussion of the history and technology of printing from moveable type, participants will set type and, using the iron handpress, print a keepsake to take with them.

This lecture combines a presentation of some outstanding results of 20th-century science with an in-depth reflection about philosophical questions that have direct bearing on scientific knowledge. It is of potential interest to science and humanities students alike.

The 20th century has discovered two important limitations of scientific knowledge. On the one hand, the combination of Poincaré’s nonlinear dynamics and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle leads to a world picture where physical reality is, in many respects, intrinsically undetermined. On the other hand, Gödel’s incompleteness theorems reveal us the existence of mathematical truths that cannot be demonstrated. More recently, Chaitin has proved that, from the incompleteness theorems, it follows that the random character of a given mathematical sequence cannot be proved in general (it is ‘undecidable’). I reflect here on the consequences derived from the indeterminacy of the future and the undecidability of randomness, concluding that the question of the presence or absence of finality in nature is fundamentally outside the scope of the scientific method.

Curious about how a book is made? Join Harvard Library Preservation Services staff to make a book of your very own. Using a historic technique, you will complete a book to use for notes, journaling, or just to impress your friends! All tools and materials provided.

This course will help to strengthen an advanced study and analysis of the European Union constitutional law and government. The students will debate and discuss about fundamental documents of the EU, legal texts, and doctrinal publications. This course also gives a comparative vision of the US and EU decision-making processes.

This course will provide with elementary and advanced information about the EU fundamental rights system and how it works and interacts within the Member States in contrast with the US judicial review and the States judges and Supreme Court decision on fundamental rights and interpretations of the fundamental law.

This event puts the poetry of five young acclaimed poets from Spain in conversation with each other’s. They will uncover their life experience inside and outside poetry, read their own work, and recite and react to the poems of their peers. It is a wonderful occasion to see activism, interaction and development within a group of new Spanish talented artists.

This event will have Joanna Ebenstein, co-founder (with Tracy Hurley Martin) and creative director of the Morbid Anatomy Museum in New York and J. W. Ocker, author of The New England Grimpendium and Poe-Land and webmaster of O.T.I.S. explaining the experience of having a life dedicated to this lesser-explored, sometimes neglected, side of culture, oddities, and the bizarre—and why it is so appealing to a certain public.

 

Between the 1950s and 1980s many people claimed and fought for the cultural and political unity of the Catalan-speaking regions of Spain. This lecture focuses on the contribution of architecture to the ideological construction of the so-called Catalan Countries. A GSAS student should attend if she is interested in the intertwining of architectural and political debates, and in the territorial tensions Spain is experiencing today. A GSAS student should expect to gain knowledge of Spain, its rich cultural diversity, and its complex recent history.

Reading & Conserving the New England Landscape: an immersive week-long program for Harvard students (FAS undergrad, GSAS grad, all concentrations). Daily field trips offer a variety of perspectives on real-world ecological and conservation topics. Also includes art, writing, and design workshops. Program is cost-free, with support from the FAS Dean. Limited to 10 students. Learn more and apply at http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/winter-break-week-harvard-forest.

Location: 
Sugarloaf Resort, Maine

Get out into the powder and catch some vertical motion this January! Head up to Sugarloaf Resort, Maine, on one of two 3-day trips during the last week of J-term:

  • Trip 1: depart at 10:00 AM from Harvard Square on Jan 18 (Mon), return late on Jan 21 (Thurs). Cost: $390.  
  • Trip 2: depart at 11:00 AM from Harvard Square on Jan 21 (Thurs), return late on Jan 24 (Sun). Cost: $440.

Each package includes: coach transportation to and from Sugarloaf, 3 full days of skiing including lessons, 3 nights of condo accommodation, 2 restaurant dinners, a goodie bag (filled with handwarmers, snacks, and water), access to pool, saunas and hot tubs, fitness center and snowshoeing/x-country skiing. If you need to rent equipment, a full set (snowboard or skis+poles, and boots) is $72 extra (for the 3 days). Helmets are extra. 

Tickets go on sale on MONDAY NOVEMBER 23 at 9:00 AM on the 3rd floor of Dudley House. Tickets sell very quickly so arrive early. We do not accept sign-ups by phone or email. You can sign up a friend if you have their forms and payment. Payment is by cash or check to Harvard University. Dudley House members may bring a guest. Please download, print and fill in the sign-up form and waiver ahead of time.

Cancellations:
Tickets are not refundable. You can, however, sell your ticket to someone else if you can't go.

For any further questions, contact Dudley Outings (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

On this retreat we will explore mindfulness, through formal meditation periods and relational mindfulness activities. Together, we will develop our skills of focused concentration, introspection, compassion, and insight. The emerging science of mindfulness suggests that mindfulness can help build emotional resilience, inner strength and well-being. Retreat practice helps us develop the flexibility to be present, kind, and skillful whether we are alone or interacting with others.

Each day will primarily be held in silence and will include sitting and walking meditation, small group activities, movement and free time. Please come prepared to participate in all aspects of the retreat with curiosity and a willingness to engage with challenge.

This retreat is only for students enrolled at Harvard University. Bus transportation will be provided.

Retreat Reservation:

Step 1: Fill out the confidential online registration form via the button below. Allot at least 20 minutes for completion of the form. You can save your progress if needed. If you are unable to complete the registration or payment online, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call (978) 254-7082.

That’s it! We look forward to seeing you on retreat!

This retreat is made possible through a generous alumni donation. By registering you are committing to attend the full retreat. Cancellations received after Friday December 18th, 2015 at 5pm will incur a $100 fee.

 

 

Join local singers for an introduction to an energetic and uniquely American tradition of a cappella singing! We’ll sit in the traditional hollow square formation and learn to sing from shape-note notation—then we'll let loose with vibrant tunes by composers ancient and living. No musical experience is necessary.

Take an energetic break this Wintersession to learn the rhythms of the Kizomba dance style. Kizomba is a popular musical dance style originating from Angola and influenced by the Caribbean zouk.The Kizomba workshops will be presented by a professional dancer Inna Grant. Participants may attend all or any of the workshops for free!