Seminars, workshops, and recreational opportunities designed especially for GSAS students, to help you build professional skills and make the most of the winter break.
 

Topics:
Student Run Mini-Courses
Professional Development
Arts, Culture, and Recreation

TitleStartEnd
December 31
Shaping Policy with Science 7:00 pm7:00 pm
Shaping Policy with Science 7:00 pm7:00 pm
December 24
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
December 25
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
January 2
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
January 3
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
January 6
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
January 7
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:00 pm
January 8
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
January 9
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
EndNote, Mendeley, RefWorks, Zotero: How Do I Use Them? And Why? 2:00 pm3:30 pm
January 10
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
EndNote, Mendeley, RefWorks, Zotero: How Do I Use Them? And Why? 10:00 am11:30 am
January 11
Waterworks Museum Visit 10:00 am3:00 pm
U.S. Figure Skating Championship 11:30 am12:00 am
January 12
Fireside Gathering 7:00 pm10:00 pm
January 13
Introduction to the European Union and Law 8:00 am2:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 8:00 am9:00 am
Harvard Course in Reading and Study Strategies 8:30 am10:30 am
Communicating Science Workshops for Graduate Students 8:30 am2:00 pm
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
Rise and Shine Boot Camp 9:00 am1:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 9:30 am10:30 am
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
j-Fab Workshop 10:00 am4:00 pm
Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs 10:00 am12:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 11:00 am12:00 pm
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Mendeley: Getting Started 2:00 pm3:30 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Houghton Library: Introduction to Bibliography 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
Workshop on regional and economic integration systems. Theory 3:00 pm7:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
January 14
Introduction to the European Union and EU Law. Institutions 8:00 am2:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 8:00 am9:00 am
Harvard Course in Reading and Study Strategies 8:30 am10:30 am
Rise and Shine Boot Camp 9:00 am1:00 pm
Write @ 5 Linden 9:00 am5:00 pm
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 9:30 am10:30 am
j-Fab Workshop 10:00 am4:00 pm
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:00 pm
Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs 10:00 am12:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 11:00 am12:00 pm
Digital Photography for Beginners 1:00 pm2:00 pm
All About Archives 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Workshop 2:00 pm3:00 pm
What is the “Soul” in Indian Philosophy? 2:00 pm4:30 pm
Finding Images: Harvard Collections & Beyond 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Zotero: Getting Started 2:00 pm3:30 pm
The Pocket Guide to Your Mental Health 4:00 pm6:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
January 15
Introduction to European Union and EU Law. Governance 8:00 am2:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 8:00 am9:00 am
Harvard Course in Reading and Study Strategies 8:30 am10:30 am
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
Rise and Shine Boot Camp 9:00 am1:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Houghton Library: Printing Workshop 9:30 am11:30 am
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 9:30 am10:30 am
j-Fab Workshop 10:00 am4:00 pm
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs 10:00 am12:00 pm
Welding Seminar - TIG Welding and Torch Brazing 11:00 am12:00 pm
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Workshop 12:00 pm1:00 pm
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Digital Photography for Beginners 1:00 pm2:00 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
Basic Sewing Workshop 4:00 pm6:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
January 16
Introduction to European Union and EU Law. Fundamental Rights 8:00 am2:00 pm
Harvard Course in Reading and Study Strategies 8:30 am10:30 am
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Micro-Fab: Intro to Softlithography Microfluidics and BioMedical Applications 10:00 am4:00 pm
Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs 10:00 am12:00 pm
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Workshop 12:30 pm2:00 pm
Digital Photography for Beginners 1:00 pm2:00 pm
What is the “Soul” in Indian Philosophy? 2:00 pm4:30 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
The Pocket Guide to Your Mental Health 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
January 17
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Introduction to European Union and EU Law. Sovereignty 8:00 am2:00 pm
Harvard Course in Reading and Study Strategies 8:30 am10:30 am
Computation/Simulation 9:00 am12:00 pm
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
Houghton Library: Graphic Techniques Workshop 9:30 am11:30 am
GIS Institute 9:30 am5:00 pm
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs 10:00 am12:00 pm
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Digital Photography for Beginners 1:00 pm2:00 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm7:00 pm
January 18
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
January 19
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Shaping Policy with Science 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 4:00 pm9:00 pm
January 20
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 9:00 am5:00 pm
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
Hack the Museum 10:00 am6:00 pm
The Human Face and its Role in Our Everyday Judgments, Decisions, and Behavior 10:00 am11:30 am
Digital Photography for Beginners 1:00 pm2:00 pm
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Energy 101 2:00 pm5:00 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
January 21
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Introductory Latin for Research and Pleasure 9:00 am10:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 9:00 am5:00 pm
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
j-Design Workshop 9:00 am1:00 pm
ComputeFest-The Student Computational Challenge 9:30 am12:00 am
Career Jump Start 10:00 am1:00 pm
The Human Face and its Role in Our Everyday Judgments, Decisions, and Behavior 10:00 am11:30 am
Hack the Museum 10:00 am6:00 pm
Resume & Cover Letter 101 Workshop 11:00 am12:00 pm
Interactive Visualization 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Energy 101 2:00 pm5:00 pm
What is the “Soul” in Indian Philosophy? 2:00 pm4:30 pm
Treasures of the Loeb Music Library 3:00 pm4:30 pm
How to Interview Effectively Workshop 4:00 pm5:00 pm
Win Over the Employer! How to Interview Effectively 4:00 pm5:00 pm
The Pocket Guide to Your Mental Health 4:00 pm6:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
FATCA and European Union: Implications and further steps 6:00 pm12:00 am
January 22
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 9:00 am8:00 pm
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am6:00 pm
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
Introductory Latin for Research and Pleasure 9:00 am10:00 am
j-Design Workshop 9:00 am1:00 pm
Zotero for Historical / Archival Research 9:30 am12:00 pm
Job Search Tough Questions and Negotiations 9:30 am11:30 am
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Wintersession Course 10:00 am2:00 pm
Hack the Museum 10:00 am6:00 pm
The Human Face and its Role in Our Everyday Judgments, Decisions, and Behavior 10:00 am11:30 am
ComputeFest-The Student Computational Challenge 12:00 pm12:00 am
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
How Not to Write Your Dissertation 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Fellowship Proposals Boot Camp 2:00 pm5:00 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
RefWorks Citation Management Workshop 2:00 pm3:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
Innovating Assessment in the University Classroom 3:00 pm5:00 pm
The Pocket Guide to Your Mental Health 4:00 pm6:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
Learning Organizations 5:30 pm12:00 am
Science in the News 7:30 pm9:30 pm
January 23
Harvard Recreation Winter Session 12:00 am12:00 am
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Introductory Latin for Research and Pleasure 9:00 am10:00 am
Climatocracy: the New Politics of Environmental Crisis 9:00 am1:00 pm
The Bok Center Winter Teaching Conference 9:00 am12:00 am
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am7:30 pm
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 9:00 am8:00 pm
j-Design Workshop 9:00 am1:00 pm
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Wintersession Course 10:00 am2:00 pm
Hack the Museum 10:00 am6:00 pm
The Human Face and its Role in Our Everyday Judgments, Decisions, and Behavior 10:00 am11:30 am
Workshop on Hispanic Literature and Politics 11:00 am12:00 am
RefWorks Citation Management Workshop 11:00 am12:00 pm
Behind the Scenes at the Harvard Museum of Natural History 11:00 am1:00 pm
Interactive Visualization 1:00 pm3:00 pm
ComputeFest-The Student Computational Challenge 1:30 pm12:00 am
Embodying the Classics: dancing from past to present 1:30 pm12:00 am
What is the “Soul” in Indian Philosophy? 2:00 pm4:30 pm
Energy 101 2:00 pm5:00 pm
Innovating Assessment in the University Classroom 3:00 pm5:00 pm
From Comics to Graphic Novels: An Alternative History 4:00 pm6:00 pm
The Pocket Guide to Your Mental Health 4:00 pm6:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm6:00 pm
January 24
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Competitiveness through Cluster policies 12:00 am12:00 am
Communicating Science Workshops for Graduate Students 8:30 am2:00 pm
ComputeFest- Weathering the Data Storm: The Promise and Challenges of Data Science 8:30 am6:00 pm
j-Design Workshop 9:00 am1:00 pm
Alumni January Initiative: Careers in Strategy Consulting 9:00 am12:00 pm
MSI Graduate Consortium Microscopy Workshop 9:00 am6:00 pm
Introductory Latin for Research and Pleasure 9:00 am11:00 am
Jumpstart EE Rapid Prototyping: Session 1-EE skills practicum 9:00 am12:00 pm
Harvard Forest Winter Break week 9:00 am8:00 pm
ComputeFest-The Student Computational Challenge 9:30 am12:00 am
Hack the Museum 10:00 am6:00 pm
Personal Finance: Secrets to Success Wintersession Course 10:00 am2:00 pm
The Human Face and its Role in Our Everyday Judgments, Decisions, and Behavior 10:00 am11:30 am
Hand Made Mugs Workshop 10:00 am2:30 pm
Alien Worlds on Earth 10:00 am11:30 am
The Great Criminal: Why We Love to Watch Gangsters, Thieves, and Psychopaths 1:00 pm3:00 pm
Alumni January Initiative: Careers in Finance 1:00 pm5:00 pm
Jumpstart EE Rapid Prototyping: Session 2-Build a Mouse 1:00 pm4:00 pm
Energy 101 2:00 pm5:00 pm
The Biology of Superheroes: Exploring the Limits of Form and Function 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Innovating Assessment in the University Classroom 3:00 pm5:00 pm
Con Men, Neuroscience and Magic: How the World of Illusion Can Inform Our Understanding of Human Perception 3:00 pm4:00 pm
Yoga: From the Myth to the Mat 5:00 pm7:00 pm
January 25
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
Alumni January Initiative: Careers in Non-Profits and Government Agencies 8:00 am12:00 pm
Alumni January Initiative: Starting Your Own Business 1:00 pm5:00 pm
Chamber Music Concert 7:00 pm12:00 am
January 26
Dudley House Ski Trip 12:00 am12:00 am
January 27
Non-Verbal Communication: How it Affects Your Job Search 4:00 pm5:00 pm
January 28
Career Jump Start 10:00 am12:30 pm
Talk Your Way into a Great Job 10:00 am11:30 am
Student Run Mini-Courses

This course introduces comic books into the academic context by focusing on the transition from comic books to what is commonly called graphic novels. It offers an alternative history to most studies of comics by mostly focusing on texts written by non-English-language authors, and centering on autobiographical and historical narratives. The course looks at some of the most acclaimed nonfiction and autobiographical comic books, such as Maus, Persepolis, and Fun Home, as well as lesser-known (in the United States) but still internationally famous and enormously influential works such as Barefoot Gen, a Japanese manga about Hiroshima, and David B.’s Epileptic, a French autobiographical graphic novel centering around disability. The reading list is a broad survey to suit a variety of readers, and each class is organized around a particular theme, such as women’s autobiography, disability studies, trauma, and wordless graphic novels. 

Fundamental concepts in theory and practice forming a critical foundation for yoga approached from two perspectives: 1) as a philosophical path, and 2) as a physical discipline. Topics include yoga philosophy, history, asana, pranayama, chakras, meditation, and modern controversies. Two yoga practices included. Come learn, play, and namaste!

This course is designed to provide participants with the framework they need to thoughtfully analyze technological, environmental, economic, and policy issues in energy, and to start forming opinions on domestic/global energy policy. The course will run for five consecutive days from January 20-24, with a 3-hour workshop each day. The workshops will blend lectures with overviews of particular topics and guided breakout sessions where participants will tackle specific problems or calculations relevant to the presentation topics. The combination of high-quality and focused lectures, targeted practice sessions, and a manageable time commitment makes Energy 101 a unique and valuable resource for Harvard students.

 

What will more frequent and extreme environmental disasters mean for our social, political, and economic systems? Can democracy as we know it coexist with a dramatically less stable world? How can states be expected to provide for their most vulnerable citizens? The UN predicts 50 million environmental refugees by 2020: how and where will they be accommodated? This thoroughly interdisciplinary course will provide a broad overview of these and related questions.

In this course we will explore the limits of human cognition and attention and see how magicians use these to fool us into thinking that they can bend spoons with the power of their minds or that a chosen card can travel through a deck to reveal itself.  We will look at how magicians imitate nature by looking at how appearing silks and flashes of fire are based on the same principles that stick insects or antelope use to avoid predators. We will discuss how con artists and fortune tellers use our social adaptations and innate predispositions against us. And we will talk about how superstitions and preconceived notions work to make us more susceptible to being conned or deceived and discuss ways of avoiding becoming and easy mark. 

Comic books have captivated and sparked the imagination of  contemporary society for decades and have recently inundated popular culture through film and television. Stories of superhumans, giant monsters, and other bizarre biological phenomena stretch our imagination and force us to ponder the limits of possibility in the natural world. In this course we will combine topics posed in popular graphic novels, television and movies with contemporary scientific research to explore bizarre phenomena in the natural world and delve into basic scientific theory and principles.

The proposed course seeks to provide students with a broad introduction to the human face. Topics to be covered include the evolutionary importance of the face, facial attractiveness and beauty, facial processing and recognition, facial emotion, and our use of the face when forming social judgments and when making economic and legal decisions. Throughout the length of the course, the salience of the face in human culture will be highlighted as it has been portrayed in various interesting pieces of literature, film, and visual art.

Did you know that alien worlds exist right here on Earth? Come with us as we dive to the dark depths of the ocean, peer into boiling acid pools of Yellowstone, drill our way through Antarctic ice cores, and descend into the aquifers and caves that allow a peak into Earth’s crust. We will examine hydrothermal vent and other “extreme” environments, which are “alien” to us in many ways. We will touch on the geological forces that create many of these structures, the biological processes that enable dense aggregations of living material in the absence of sunlight, the physics and chemistry of why these locations are so special, the environmental processes that link these environments to global cycles, and the factors that tie us as human beings to these environments. We will also discuss what organisms inhabit these environments might be able to tell us about life beyond Earth.

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the mental health field.  Specifically, we will review how mental illness is conceptualized, assessed, and treated; tips for how to effectively access mental health services; strategies for combating stress; and common myths about clinical psychology and psychopathology.   Information taught in this class will be based upon evidence from scientific research, but will be conveyed in a way that is accessible to individuals with no background in mental health.  To our knowledge, this course is unique in that it provides students with valuable information on how to be an informed consumer of clinical psychology.

Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections pose a serious threat to human health, yet we have a paucity of solutions in the form of new therapies to address them. In Finding Drugs for Bad Bugs, we will begin the course by first studying these “germs”, learning important mechanisms of infection and resistance to current drugs. Then, we will dissect the current state of antimicrobial drug discovery and development, identifying current strategies and key remaining questions in the field. While the primary focus will be on underlying molecular mechanisms for pathogenesis and therapy, we will also address social and economic influences on discovery development.

Why are we fascinated by great criminals: the Tony Sopranos, the Walter Whites, and the Hannibal Lecters? Pop culture overflows with characters who break the law, steal what they want, and live according to their own immoral code. They’re often violent, but principled; unrepentant, but troubled; genius, but devilish. They’re also barometers of cultural anxieties. This mini-course watches excerpts from films and television shows (including Goodfellas, Breaking Bad, The Wire, Silence of the Lambs, and A Clockwork Orange) and discusses why we love to watch the great criminal.

This short course aims to provide a brief introduction to the basics of digital photography. It is targeted at beginners with little or no experience in photography. Basic knowledge and techniques of photography will be covered, such as how to use your camera, making the right lens choices, exposure triangle, lighting, composition, and post processing.

The goal of this course is to give students outside of the field of Indian Philosophy an understanding of how the soul (ātman) affected religious interpretation and knowledge of the world according to a prominent non-western philosophical tradition. Questions we will explore will involve uncovering the nature of the soul while caught up in the existence of the material world, investigating to what extent the soul is bound by the confines of a material body, and examining how human beings who possess a soul come to understand various experiences like perception, pleasure, and pain.

Over the last 20 years, cluster policies have been increasingly applied throughout the world. This seminar will cover:

- cluster definition

- cluster initiative methodologies

- cluster policy in the EU.

This event is an opportunity for GSAS students interested in gaining a basic understanding of regional economic development through cluster policies.

The speaker, Albert Sole, has been working with clusters for 12 years, he will share his experiences.

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Professional Development

In this course, you will learn to read basic Latin from legal terminology to the inscriptions on the gates of Harvard and Radcliffe Yards, and enough grammar to read some Cicero. GSAS Humanities or social sciences students may wish to attend to kick start research in Latin or for pleasure.

This course introduces the practice of shaping policy for students with expertise in STEM. Students will gain exposure to current issues of science-policy by engaging in seminar-style discussions, case-study analysis and drafting directed policy memos. Instructor will be Bina Venkataraman, Senior Advisor for Climate Change Innovation in the Obama Administration.

During the dangerously easy-to-procrastinate month of January, we will get you up, ply you with breakfast and coffee, and ensure that you get at least 12 hours of work done — and all before lunch!

A quiet and cozy space to write your thesis or dissertation. Coffee, tea and snacks will be served.

This Training Course will focus on Constitutional Law in the European Union and its relation with the constitutions of the EU Member States.

 

The Training Course will focus on how the EU is governed and the decision-making process.

The Training Course will focus on the main institutions which design and implement policies in the European Union.

The RCC Fellows and Ph.D. Candidates Bronislava Greskovicova, Cristina Sanz, José Ángel de León González and David Yagüe will present their dissertation projects on Hispanic Literature from a multidisciplinary perspective in order to foster exchange of ideas and further collaboration.

This Training Course will focus on the main topics on fundamental rights system in the European Union

The program is designed for Harvard graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty who want to learn spatial analysis and apply GIS methods in their research. No previous GIS training required, but you must have familiarity with MS Office and Internet usage.


 

RefWorks is a citation management tool that simplifies the "busy work" of research. It can compile citations directly from HOLLIS and library databases; create your bibliography in the format you choose; and insert citations or footnotes in your text as you write. Harvard librarians will offer training sessions in the basics of RefWorks at Lamont Library.

This short course will introduce and motivate the use of interactive data visualization as a powerful tool for communicating research ideas based on data. We will look at motivating examples from different fields, discuss the main principles behind creating an interactive visualization, and work on creating your first interactive user experience with d3js, a popular library for data-driven documents. No prior programming experience is assumed although it will be helpful to accelerate the progress.

Join us for an intensive week of hacking the Harvard Museum of Natural History -- experimenting with what could happen in the museum space if our assumptions no longer held true.  Each student will create an intervention for the museum, and at the end of the week we'll host an evening open house for friends and other students, and bring the museum to life.

Learn to write a winning fellowship proposal!

Students will receive feed-back on their own proposal writing and also offer the same to their fellow students.

Registration Required.

In this four-session series for PhD students, you will consider whether a nonacademic career is right for you and learn the skills needed to begin the transition through in-depth self-assessment, brainstorming, and exploring career options.

The best way to find the perfect job is to meet with and gather information from people already working in your field of interest. This workshop will demystify the process of networking and give you practical tips on how to actually get out there and talk your way into a fabulous job!

You might not think that things like hairstyle, tone of voice, facial expressions or posture would affect your networking, interviewing, and negotiating processes, but in fact you would be incorrect! Come learn ways to effectively communicate non-verbally so that you can leave a positive lasting impression with all those that you meet.

Have you received an invitation to interview for an academic or nonacademic job? What question do you dread most?  Do you have an important personal issue that impacts on your decision to accept a job offer, such as work visa issues, family considerations, need for a workplace accepting of your sexual orientation, religion, or other concern?  Attend this discussion led by all three of the GSAS career counselors and bring your toughest questions!

You have an interview. Now what? This workshop will discuss the different types of interviews, what hiring managers look for and tips on how to answer tough questions.

If you are writing your dissertation, you know that the process is as challenging as it is rewarding. In this workshop, a panel of GSAS students will share advice about how and how NOT to write dissertations. Our focus will be on developing practical strategies for overcoming obstacles and identifying best practices.

The Graduate School Alumni Association Council, the GSAS Business Club, and the GSAS Consulting Club present this popular event as part of the January@GSAS programming.

The four alumni-led workshops for students will each include a series of presentations focusing on how PhD skills and expertise can be applied to these various, non-academic settings. You will hear from GSAS alumni who have successfully navigated this transition and learn about their industries and experiences. Read the full agenda of events below. The workshops will take place in the Pfizer Lecture Hall in the Mallinkrodt Building (12 Oxford St.).

Afternoon Session – Finance

1-1:15pm: Welcome

Garth McCavana, GSAS Dean for Student Affairs

1:15-2pm: “Portfolio Management and Trading: Ph.D.s and Finance”
Karen J. Hladik, Ph.D., Quantitative Specialist/Fund Manager and Former Global Head of Risk & Quantitative Services, GSS, at Goldman Sachs & Co.

2-2:30pm: “Quantitative Risk Management & Increased Regulation in Capital Markets”
Imad Kordab, Ph.D., Quantitative Analyst in Credit Risk Analytics

2:30-2:45pm: Break

2:45-3:30pm:“Investment Banking and Private Banking”
Kenneth Froewiss, Ph.D., Director at DWS Mutual Funds and Former Managing Director in the Financial Institutions Group at J.P. Morgan

3:30-4pm: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Finance
Kenneth Froewiss, Karen J. Hladik, Imad Kordab, and Heather Law (OCS)

4-5pm: Reception and Networking

The Graduate School Alumni Association Council, the GSAS Business Club, and the GSAS Consulting Club present this popular event as part of the January@GSAS programming.

The four alumni-led workshops for students will each include a series of presentations focusing on how PhD skills and expertise can be applied to these various, non-academic settings. You will hear from GSAS alumni who have successfully navigated this transition and learn about their industries and experiences. Read the full agenda of events below. The workshops will take place in the Pfizer Lecture Hall in the Mallinkrodt Building (12 Oxford St.).

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25

Afternoon Session – Starting Your Own Business

1-1:15pm: Welcome

1:15-2pm:”So You Think You Want to Start a Business…?”
Reinier Beeuwkes, Ph.D., Chairman and President of Ischemix, Inc.

2-2:30pm: “Perspectives on Starting Your Own Company”
Daniel Johnson, AM, GSA, Founder of American Financial Systems

2:30-2:45pm: Break

2:45-3:15pm:“A Tale of Two Companies: Two Approaches for Starting Companies in the Life Sciences”
Dennis E. Vaccaro, Ph.D., Co-founder and Chairman of BioPhysics Assay Laboratory

3:15-4pm: Panel and Q&A on Starting Your Own Business
Reinier BeeuwkesDaniel JohnsonDennis E. Vaccaro, and Heather Law (OCS)

4-5pm: Reception and Networking


 

The Graduate School Alumni Association Council, the GSAS Business Club, and the GSAS Consulting Club present this popular event as part of the January@GSAS programming.

The four alumni-led workshops for students will each include a series of presentations focusing on how PhD skills and expertise can be applied to these various, non-academic settings. You will hear from GSAS alumni who have successfully navigated this transition and learn about their industries and experiences. Read the full agenda of events below. The workshops will take place in the Pfizer Lecture Hall in the Mallinkrodt Building (12 Oxford St.).

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25

8-9am: Breakfast and Networking

Morning Session – Non-Profits and Government Agencies

9-9:15am: Welcome

9:15-10am: “Introduction to Non-Profits and Government Agencies”

Richard Ekman, Ph.D., President of the Council of Independent Colleges and Former Secretary and Senior Program Officer of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

10-10:30am: “Careers in Global Health”
Cherie Ramirez, Ph.D., Harvard Global Health Institute

10:30-10:45am: Break

10:45-11:30am: "Research Outside Academe: Costs and Benefits"

Richard D. Brecht, Ph.D., Founding Executive Director, University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language, and Founding Chair, Board of Trustees, American Councils for International Education

11:30am-12noon: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Non-Profits and Government Agencies

Richard Ekman, Cherie Ramirez, and Laura Stark (OCS)

A career development program open exclusively to Harvard and MIT graduate students.

Scholars learn by communicating.  Join us for a two-day workshop empowering graduate students to communicate complex and technical concepts to broad and diverse audiences.  Will involve: one-on-one interaction with leaders in scholarly communication from Harvard, MIT, and beyond. Writing sessions with peer and expert review. Panel discussions on communicating through writing, video, audio, the web, and more.

This conference is open to TF's, TA's, CA's, Lecturers, Preceptors and Faculty and will include sessions on the fundamentals of teaching for first time teachers.

** New insights for experienced teachers

** Professional Development Sessions

** BREAKFAST and LUNCH!

The Bok Center Center Teaching Certificate program is offering a mini-course during J-term on proficiency-oriented language instruction using the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines as a general framework for organizing instruction and assessment.

The Graduate School Alumni Association Council, the GSAS Business Club, and the GSAS Consulting Club present this popular event as part of the January@GSAS programming.

The four alumni-led workshops will each include a series of presentations focusing on how PhD skills and expertise can be applied to these various, non-academic settings. You will hear from GSAS alumni who have successfully navigated this transition and learn about their industries and experiences. Read the full agenda of events below. The workshops will take place in the Pfizer Lecture Hall in the Mallinckrodt Building, 12 Oxford Street.

Through in-depth programming, you’ll explore how your research and analytical skills can assist you as you transition to professional settings where those skills are beneficial. You’ll hear from successful alumni about their own tracks and their experiences in global industry. And you’ll have networking opportunities galore!

8-9am: Breakfast and Networking

Morning Session – Strategy Consulting

9-9:15am: Welcome

9:15-9:45am: “Strategy in a Connected World”
Mia A. M. de Kuijper, Ph.D., Founder & CEO of Cambridge Global Partners and Former Cheif Strategist and CFO at Pepsi-Cola International

9:45-10:15am: “Why Consulting is an Exciting Career”
Sandra Moose, Ph.D., Senior Advisor to BCG and Former Senior VP of BCG

10:15-10:30am: Break

10:30-11am: “Making Strategy Actionable”
Alan Kantrow, Ph.D., Managing Partner of Alan Kantrow LLC and Former Senior Partner and Chief Knowledge Officer at Monitor

11-11:30am: “Translating Your Talent and Skills to Client Engagements”
Marianne Steiner, SM, MEN, Founder and Principal of Larkspur Marketing

11:30am-12noon: Panel and Q&A on Careers in Strategy Consulting
Mia A. M. de Kuijper, Alan Kantrow, Sandra Moose, Marianne Steiner, and Heather Law (OCS)

This workshop is a crash-course on Zotero, a powerful, free, and easy-to-use tool for collecting, organizing, and citing your research. In addition to Zotero basics, we will delve into the most effective uses of Zotero for historical / archival research, including as a research log and for managing research images.

Do you want to do research in archives and special collections? In this hands-on workshop you will learn how to find research funding, locate archives and understand how they're organized, decipher finding aids and access policies, properly handle a variety of materials, keep effective research notes, capture and organize images, and secure permission to publish your findings. Archivists and librarians from across campus will be on hand to answer questions and help you get started on a project.

A three-day hands on design and fabrication workshop that introduces several techniques involved in mechanical and electrical rapid prototyping. These techniques include: 3D solid model design and simulation using SolidWorks; g-code generation using MasterCam; CNC milling; 3D printing; laser cutting; and soldering.

IACS has joined with several partners to offer an expanded workshop program this year during the week of January 13-17, 2014, including presentations from Amazon Web Services, Mathworks, Nvidia, IQSS, and more! The program features instruction in software tools for modeling, analysis, scientific computing and visualization, as well as how to use cluster, grid and cloud resources with support of Academic Computing.

During the evenings of January 21-24, Harvard faculty and researchers will lead workshops in Python and Matlab designed for undergraduates with no prior experience in these programs.

WHAT: Members of the IACS teaching faculty have crafted a game that tests students' programming, mathematical and strategic skills. The rules of the game will be revealed at kickoff. Teams will be allocated equal computational resources and, if needed, workspaces at SEAS.

WHO: Harvard undergraduates and graduate students up to the G2 level are eligible to participate. Students may form and register self-selected teams of 2-3 players or sign up as individuals to be matched with other players to form teams

WHY: Students will play for fun, pride and prizes. The winners will be announced before academic and industry leaders at a ceremony during the Symposium on the Future of Computation in Science and Engineering on Friday, January 24.

 

WHEN: The Challenge will kick off on Tuesday, January 21, 2014. Teams will play friendly games with each other and the Challenge organizers on Wednesday, January 22, to refine their tactics. The championship game will be played Thursday, January 23.

 

IACS has joined with several partners to offer an expanded workshop program this year during the week of January 13-17, 2014, including presentations from Amazon Web Services, Mathworks, Nvidia, IQSS, and more! The program features instruction in software tools for modeling, analysis, scientific computing and visualization, as well as how to use cluster, grid and cloud resources with support of Academic Computing.

During the evenings of January 21-24, Harvard faculty and researchers will lead workshops in Python and Matlab designed for undergraduates with no prior experience in these programs.

This event explores some of the extraordinary entrepreneurial opportunities on the frontier of computational science. Participants will hear from and speak with innovators seizing these opportunities. Computational Science Ventures is organized by Alexander Wissner-Gross, a scientist, inventor and entrepreneur who is Institute Fellow at IACS.

 

Speakers
Marija Ilic

Professor at Carnegie Mellon University

Ted Morgan
Founder and CEO of Skyhook

Sokwoo Rhee
Founder/CTO of Millennial Net and Presidential Innovation Fellow

Session Chair: Alexander Wissner-Gross

IACS has joined with several partners to offer an expanded workshop program this year during the week of January 13-17, 2014, including presentations from Amazon Web Services, Mathworks, Nvidia, IQSS, and more! The program features instruction in software tools for modeling, analysis, scientific computing and visualization, as well as how to use cluster, grid and cloud resources with support of Academic Computing.

During the evenings of January 21-24, Harvard faculty and researchers will lead workshops in Python and Matlab designed for undergraduates with no prior experience in these programs.

Symposium Co-Chairs:

Hanspeter, Computer Science

Joe Blitzstein, Statistics

Pavlos Protopapas, Institute for Applied Computational Science

Industry leaders, researchers, and Harvard students will gather for a day of lively conversation about the sweeping advances in data science at the intersection of statistics, computer science, and various domains. Leading experts in data science will talk about the way organizations are using careful analysis of data to address important real-world issues, about the challenges of big data, and about the future of this exciting emerging field. This one-day symposium will bring together data analytics professionals, domain scientists, academic researchers and users, and fosters an exchange of ideas through invited talks, panels, and plenty of audience interaction.

 Speakers:

• Ryan Adams, Harvard University

• Luke Bornn, Harvard University

• Jeff Heer, University of Washington

• Diane Lambert, Google

• Fernando Perez, UC Berkeley

• Claudia Perlich, Dstillery

• Bonnie Ray, IBM

• Cynthia Rudin, MIT

 • Rachel Schutt, News Corp.

 • Yuan Yuan, Dropbox

Symposium Sponsors:

Platinum - Liberty Mutual

Gold - VMWare

Market yourself and gain an edge in today's job market by learning how to write an effective resume and cover letter. From writing effective accomplishment statements to deciding what to include and what to leave out, this workshop discusses, step by step, how to build and improve your resume and cover letter writing skills.

You have an interview. Now what? This workshop will discuss the different types of interviews, what hiring managers look for, and tips on how to answer tough questions.

Provides skills in breadboard, WW, PCB design flow, soldering, basic circuits design flow and implementation of electronic circuits, basic EE instruments, devices, methods. This

Practicum is designed to give the participants a ‘jumpstart’ on the EE prototyping skills in which the project is to fabricate a ‘H-SEAS’ LED ornament.

This workshop teaches participants how to use the Arduino platform to make their own computer mouse that they can take home and use.  Participants will learn the basics of digital electrical prototyping - how to work with microcontrollers, digital communications protocols, and basic PTH soldering.  In addition, they will learn about practical design considerations while making a truly usable personal example of what they learned.

The Training Course will focus on the main and basic topics on constitutional law in the European Union, its governance and the fundamental institutions of the EU and the similarities and differences with the US federalism and the sovereignty of the states. Speaker: José Manuel Martínez Sierra, Jean Monnet ad Personam Chair of Constitutional Law and RCC Director.

XXI century companies will be very different from XX century ones. What are the important values, culture and employees behavior of these companies? Why learning organizations play faster and better? The proposed talk seeks to give an introduction to the learning organizations philosophy and to encourage students to think about the different company’s culture and his/her personals preferences.

This lecture will analyze FATCA, a US regulation which combats tax evasion through an automatic information exchange, and the impact on the EU and its Directives on this issue.  Speakers: Yanna Franco, Professor of Economics at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and RCC Fellow, and Ignacio Jiménez Macías, RCC Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

Using direct and indirect methods – including measures of memory, comprehension, competency, attitude, engagement, satisfaction, perspective, and interest – how can instructors authentically and effectively measure student learning in higher education? Over the course of three sessions, participants in this seminar will learn foundational research from the social and learning sciences that informs university-level learning assessment, apply that research to develop innovative and authentic assessments of their own, and explore the state of current assessment research with the HILT research team.

Have a hard drive full of pdfs? Mendeley can not only organize them for you, but allows you to annotate them and share them with colleagues. In addition it can generate citations in your word processing program and it syncs easily with mobile devices. It also has social media features that allow you to connect with other scholars sharing your interests. This hands-on workshop will give you enough information to get started using Mendeley. Please visit www.mendeley.com to download Mendeley onto your computer before the workshop.

In this course we’ll discuss the basics of the Zotero reference and citation management system to collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources. You should sign up for a Zotero account before the class itself – if you have any difficulty with this process, contact us ahead of time.

Confused about “citation tools?” Wondering which one to choose – or why you need one? We’ll explain the magic of citation tools, show you four popular tools, and compare the features of each one. You’ll walk away with a better sense of how to use these tools to manage your research so you’ll always be able to find that one article again, and when it’s time to do your bibliography the completed pages in the proper format will be just a few clicks of your mouse away.

Get acquainted with the Music Library! In this hands-on session, librarians will introduce you to treasures from special collections: manuscripts, early editions, jazz charts, field recordings, and more. Tell us your research focus in advance, and we'll find related materials. Drop in for all or part of the session.

This program will focus on the integration model from an economic and political perspective, with a comparison between the European Union and Latin American integration organizations.Speaker: José Manuel Martínez Sierra, Jean Monnet ad Personam Chair of Constitutional Law and RCC Director.

Interested in improving science communication with the general public? Get involved with Science In The News, a GSAS graduate student organization, open to all graduate students in any field of study.

 

Have a beer and snacks on us & learn how to get involved in our many programs!

Come learn more about the following: Credit (things people don't tell you about credit scores), Money Management (what you can actually do with a monthly salary), Personal Investing (basic investing fundamentals).

 

Come learn more about the following: Credit (things people don't tell you about credit scores), Money Management (what you can actually do with a monthly salary), Personal Investing (basic investing fundamentals).

 

Come learn more about the following: Credit (things people don't tell you about credit scores), Money Management (what you can actually do with a monthly salary), Personal Investing (basic investing fundamentals)

 

 

Come learn more about the following: Credit (things people don't tell you about credit scores), Money Management (what you can actually do with a monthly salary), Personal Investing (basic investing fundamentals).

If you have more time and would like to dig deeper please come to our Wintersession course from January 22nd to January 24th.  All are welcome but space is limited so please register to reserve your seat.   We hope to see you there!

 

 

Learn to read more purposefully and selectively, with greater speed and comprehension. This January session is tailored for non-native English readers. However, the session covers largely the same materials as the term-time sessions and native English readers are welcome to enroll. 

Participants will be given hands-on training to visualize microbes using various microscopy techniques, including light, fluorescence, confocal, electron (TEM and SEM) and atomic force microscopy. The workshop will also provide an opportunity to interact with MSI faculty and fellow members of the graduate consortium, both scientifically and socially.

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Arts, Culture, and Recreation

A unique opportunity for Harvard FAS/GSAS students from all concentrations to spend a week in guided exploration of Harvard's 3,700-acre outdoor lab and classroom, including field trips, lectures, and art/writing workshops. The program, including room & board, is free.

Join us for a rare opportunity to tour the incredible collections that are held behind-the-scenes at the world-renowned FAS research museums. The tour will be followed by lunch from12pm-1pm and the opportunity to explore the Harvard Museum of Natural History and Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. All galleries will be open and you can enjoy the new and changing exhibitions which make the HMSC museums a 'must-see' destination for visitors to Boston.

Join us for a field trip to Boston's Waterworks Museum!  From the museum website: "Think back to 1880. Boston’s population had grown by more than 100,000 in the last ten years. The city was welcoming many immigrants, and many of these people lived in poor housing, with inadequate water supplies. The challenge: how to get clean, portable water in abundant quantities to a city that kept growing." Come learn how engineering, architecture, social history, and public health came together to solve that challenge.

Join us at the 100th anniversary of the nation's most prestigious figure skating event and the last qualifying competition prior to the selection of the 2014 U.S. Olympic figure skating team. Dudley House is organizing an outing to see the Championship Pairs Free Skate and Free Dance.

Escape the winter chill with hot cider, cookies, and other treats in the fireside room of Dudley House. Whether you want to play games or just chat and enjoy the refreshments, this is a perfect cure for the J-term blues.

Do you bring your clothes to the dry cleaner to have them hemmed or to replace a missing button?  Stop spending money and learn how to do it yourself!  With a few simple sewing techniques, you can take care of these little alterations quickly and easily.  This 2-hour class will teach you how to fix/replace buttons, fix a hem that has come loose, hem pants or a skirt to make them actually fit you, and mend a ripped seam.  If time permits, we'll also learn how to add hidden pockets to just about any garment.  All supplies will be provided, but feel free to bring your own clothes that need fixing.  No previous sewing experience or sewing machine required.  Everyone is welcome

Get out into the powder and catch some vertical motion this January! Head up to Sugarloaf Resort, Maine, on one of two 3-day trips during the last week of J-term: Trip 1: depart from Harvard on Jan 20, return late on Jan 23. Cost: TBD, or Trip 2: depart from Harvard on Jan 23, return late on Jan 26. Cost: TBD. Each package includes: coach transportation to and from Sugarloaf, 3 full days of skiing including lessons, 3 nights of condo accommodation, 3 restaurant dinners, access to pool, saunas and hot tubs, fitness center and snowshoeing/x-country skiing.

After a brief discussion of the history and technology of printing from moveable type, participants will set type and, using the iron handpress, print a keepsake to take with them.

Houghton is offering a set of presentations and workshops designed to introduce graduate students to the examination of books as physical objects. These classes will enhance understanding in any field of study as students learn to “read” a book for evidence of its production context, its cultural value, and the experience of its readers through time.  These classes can be taken separately, or as a set.

Come and learn how to “read” books as physical objects – more than just the words they contain.  A brief introduction to the principles and practice of descriptive and analytical bibliography, the significance to textual analysis, and the importance to the study of the history of the book.

Houghton is offering a set of presentations and workshops designed to introduce graduate students to the examination of books as physical objects. These classes will enhance understanding in any field of study as students learn to “read” a book for evidence of its production context, its cultural value, and the experience of its readers through time.  These classes can be taken separately, or as a set.

Participants will learn the differences between the various techniques used historically for printing pictures -- woodcut, engraving, etching, wood engraving, lithography, and half-tone -- and will learn how to identify prints made by each process. A set of presentations and workshops designed to introduce graduate students to the examination of books as physical objects.  These classes will enhance understanding in any field of study as students learn to “read” a book for evidence of its production context, its cultural value, and the experience of its readers through time.  These classes can be taken separately, or as a set. 

Come enjoy an evening of chamber music with coffee, tea, and refreshments!  The program will include short chamber works featuring members of the Dudley House Orchestra in various chamber ensembles. Admission is free, everyone welcome.

Ice skating at the Frog Pond Skating Rink, Boston, MA (map)

Harvard recrreation has fun trips and clinics across campus throughout the week. From dodgeball, a golf simulator set up, a rock climbing excursion, a trampoline park!, to life guard training, SCUBA certification training, or CPR training, there is a wide variety of activitys to chose from.

A five day hands on design workshop where participants delve deeper into the design process, working in team to better understand a design problem they have identified, interacting directly with clients, and developing prototypes of their chosen design. Participants will be immersed in the four phases of the design process: 1. Investigate, 2. Ideate, 3. Prototype, and 4. Test and Redesign.
For each phase, students will practice various phase-specific techniques with the support of mentors from both SEAS and beyond. Teams will then apply these techniques to a design challenge identified during their investigate phase.

This Seminar is designed to be a hands on introduction to safe welding practices. It will include exercises covering three skill sets: Carrying a puddle without a filler rod, laying a bead with a filler rod, and welding butt joints in the flat position.Three-one hour session designed to give participants with no prior experience a basic understanding of welding principles which they may apply towards future fabrication and prototyping activities.

 

Whether it's for morning coffee, noon soup, or evening hot chocolate, the drinking vessel is a part of our every day lives. This workshop provides an opportunity to design and craft your own unique, utilitarian form by hand. Along with learning the ways of the wheel, you will acquire basic skills in wedging, centering, and forming basic shapes (like mugs!). This is a great opportunity to try ceramics and to gain an excellent foundation for further exploration. This workshop is for students of all levels. There will be lots of hands-on time, as you will have studio access from 10:00am to 5:00pm during the workshop days. A special session will be arranged for you to glaze your work during the Spring Term.

Antiquity served as inspiration for dancers like Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham or Mark Morris. The focus of this talk is to engage GSAS students with the classical thought through the lens of the choreographic medium. Students will obtain a dynamic and critical view of several links between past and present. Speaker: Zoa Alonso Fernandez, Visiting Scholar at the Department of Classics of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, and RCC Fellow

Harvard collections include millions of photographs and other images on paper collected to support research or as teaching aids.  Images support all types of research queries but are often difficult to locate.  Many of Harvard’s image collections are not yet cataloged and few are available in digital form.   This session, presented by Fine Arts Library staff and others, will assist participants in identifying photographs and other image types related to their fields of interest whether historical, scientific, political or aesthetic, both at Harvard and in other repositories.